Microsoft Windows 10 Enterprise

According to ZDNet, Microsoft is making the Windows 10 Enterprise edition available to business users for $7 per user per month, or $84 per user per year. The licenses are going to be available through Microsoft resellers. There will be two versions: E3 and E5.

Secure Productive Enterprise E3 — the bundle formerly named “Enterprise Cloud Suite” — will include Windows 10 Enterprise E3, Office 365 E3, and Enterprise Mobility + Security E3. (Enterprise Mobility + Security is the bundle formerly known as Enterprise Mobility Suite, if you’re still with me here.) There also will be a Secure Productive Enterprise E5 bundle, which will come with Windows 10 Enterprise E5, Office 365 E5, and Enterprise Mobility + Security E5.

Bash Shell on Windows 10

Microsoft announced today that it’s bringing in Bash shell into Windows 10. Bash or Bourne Again Shell, is the standard shell terminal for both OS X and Linux terminals. That means developers will be able to write their shell scripts in Windows 10.

How is this possible. Microsoft worked with Canonical, Ubuntu flagship company, in getting a Linux subsystem inside Windows 10 without the need for virtualization or emulation.

The native availability of a full Ubuntu environment on Windows, without virtualization or emulation, is a milestone that defies convention and a gateway to fascinatingly unfamiliar territory,” Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth said in a statement today. “In our journey to bring free software to the widest possible audience, this is not a moment we could have predicted. Nevertheless we are delighted to stand behind Ubuntu for Windows, committed to addressing the needs of Windows developers exploring Linux in this amazing new way, and excited at the possibilities heralded by this unexpected turn of events.

Does this mean no more of the dreaded backlash on paths?

There are more Windows 10 users than Windows XP

The number of Windows 10 users have surpassed the number of Windows XP users. It has been more than six months since Windows 10 was released. Considering Windows XP is no longer supported and pretty much a dying OS, I’m still amazed at how many people are still using Windows XP. I guess people are planning to ride off Windows XP into the sunset. If Windows 10 weren’t touted as being a free upgrade, I think the adoption would have been very slow. I know I wouldn’t have upgraded from Windows 7 if I had to pay for Windows 10.

Windows 10 and Your Privacy

Here’s an article from Ed Bott stirring up the controversy:

Here we go again, with another ginned-up controversy over Windows 10 and privacy. I know, I know, you’re probably as sick of this as I am, and much of the “controversy” is being spread by dedicated Microsoft haters and clueless writers who make a living with breathless clickbait. They’re actually not interested in facts, because the controversy sells so well.

Read the article.

Microsoft Has Your Encryption Key

Slashdot has posted this article claiming that Microsoft Has Your Windows 10 encryption key.

An anonymous reader writes with this bit of news from the Intercept. If you login to Windows 10 using your Microsoft account, your computer automatically uploads a copy of your recovery key to a Microsoft servers. From the article: “The fact that new Windows devices require users to backup their recovery key on Microsoft’s servers is remarkably similar to a key escrow system, but with an important difference. Users can choose to delete recovery keys from their Microsoft accounts – something that people never had the option to do with the Clipper chip system. But they can only delete it after they’ve already uploaded it to the cloud…..As soon as your recovery key leaves your computer, you have no way of knowing its fate. A hacker could have already hacked your Microsoft account and can make a copy of your recovery key before you have time to delete it. Or Microsoft itself could get hacked, or could have hired a rogue employee with access to user data. Or a law enforcement or spy agency could send Microsoft a request for all data in your account, which would legally compel them to hand over your recovery key, which they could do even if the first thing you do after setting up your computer is delete it. As Matthew Green, professor of cryptography at Johns Hopkins University puts it, ‘Your computer is now only as secure as that database of keys held by Microsoft, which means it may be vulnerable to hackers, foreign governments, and people who can extort Microsoft employees.'”

Dual Boot Windows 10 and Linux

The proper way of installing a dual boot mode computer running Windows 10 and Linux is the same as in other versions of Windows. You should install Windows 10 first, then install Linux second. That’s the best approach in my opinion. If you do it the other way, you will lose the ability to boot into Linux, because Windows overwrites Grub, the boot loader program used in Linux. You will have to boot your system with a Linux CD, repair Grub and add the Windows instance in Grub. That’s just too much work. Sometimes you don’t have much of choice. Even if Linux is already installed, it’s much easier to blow it up and reinstall.

Get Windows 10 Now

Today is July 29. Windows 10 is now available. Microsoft has been taking reservations for the Windows 10 update leading up to today. There’s no telling when your system will actually be updated. However, Mashable is saying that there’s a way to get the newly released Windows 10 now instead of waiting for it. Forcing the update requires that you to access the command line and run this command.

C:\> wuauclt.exe/updatenow

I tried to do the upgrade, but I ran into another issue. I’m using an older motherboard with a Nvidia GeForce 6150SE nForce 430 GPU. Microsoft is telling me that the display manufacturer, which is nVidia, hasn’t made my display compatible with Windows 10. Microsoft says to check your manufacturer for support. Basically, I have two options. Wait for nVidia to tell Microsoft nForce 430 is compatible with Windows 10 or get a new GPU. The latter is the quickest fix.

Microsoft’s Cortana

Cortana is Microsoft’s equivalent to Apple’s Siri and Google Now. Cortana is Microsoft’s digital voice assistant that will be available in Windows 10. Cortana voices are going to be customized to the user’s home country. Initially, it will be available in the US, UK, China, France, Italy, Germany and Spain. The rest of the world would have to wait. If you like to hear some voice samples, here is Time’s article about Cortana.

Windows 7 and Windows 10

When Microsoft decided to make Windows 10 a free upgrade, it pushed many people that were still on Windows XP to purchase Windows 7, since Windows 7 gets them to the promised land, which is Windows 10. It’s a brilliant strategy by Microsoft to get people who were reluctant in purchasing another Windows product, to actually spend for a new OS. It might be a free upgrade, but you need at least Windows 7 to upgrade to the new OS. We just hope Microsoft delivers on Windows 10, because they have had a spotty record with regards to releasing Windows OS.