Bash Shell on Windows 10

Microsoft announced today that it’s bringing in Bash shell into Windows 10. Bash or Bourne Again Shell, is the standard shell terminal for both OS X and Linux terminals. That means developers will be able to write their shell scripts in Windows 10.

How is this possible. Microsoft worked with Canonical, Ubuntu flagship company, in getting a Linux subsystem inside Windows 10 without the need for virtualization or emulation.

The native availability of a full Ubuntu environment on Windows, without virtualization or emulation, is a milestone that defies convention and a gateway to fascinatingly unfamiliar territory,” Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth said in a statement today. “In our journey to bring free software to the widest possible audience, this is not a moment we could have predicted. Nevertheless we are delighted to stand behind Ubuntu for Windows, committed to addressing the needs of Windows developers exploring Linux in this amazing new way, and excited at the possibilities heralded by this unexpected turn of events.

Does this mean no more of the dreaded backlash on paths?

Ubuntu Server Upgrade

I performed a Linux Server upgrade from 12.04 LTS to 14.04 LTS last night. Disaster. Well, the upgrade wasn’t quite as seamless than I thought. Apache died. I was getting 500 error on all my websites. I wasn’t about to spend hours trying to fix Apache, and who knows what else was not working. I have several applications running on my Linode VPS server in addition to the standard LAMP. So, I started the image recovery 20 minutes after I found out things weren’t working as well as they should be. My only other option now is to create a new server from scratch with the latest Ubuntu Server release, and then migrate all my apps and data. I think I’ll wait for 16.04 LTS to come out in a couple of months.

Ubuntu 14.04.4 LTS

Canonical just released Ubuntu 14.04.4 LTS. This is the 4th update to the 14.04 series which was originally released back in April 2014. It’s probably the most stable Ubuntu to date, after being baked in the oven the last 2 years. I don’t think they will release another one with this series since Ubuntu 16.04 just around the horizon.

RIP Mandriva Linux

Mandriva Linux is deader that dead. How could that be? Well, for one, the distro hasn’t been updated since 2011. Most of the developers were laid off as early as 2010. Whatever is left of the company called Mandriva, is liquidating pretty much all its assets. Mandrake, the predecessor of Mandriva, used to be my favorite Linux distro. You can view my post about Mandrake here back in 2004. There’s another post here. Mandriva had quite a market share back in its day. Then came Ubuntu. Ubuntu pretty much took the wind out of Mandriva’s sail. So, here we are now. There are a couple of forks. Mageia and OpenMandriva are chugging along.

Best Linux Distros Available

Several weeks ago, I wrote on this blog about the Linux distros that people should try. I wasn’t far off on my assessment when I read this article by Digital Trends. As you can see, I stuck with the tried-and-true distros that are popular, as well as distros which represented the major Linux branches, and distros which people generally consider as very solid. As you can see, you can’t go wrong with Debian, Fedora, Centos, and Ubuntu. You throw in Mint, one the most popular distros nowadays, and you have a very good list.

Linux Distros to Try

DistroWatch.com has a list of Linux distros and ranks them based on popularity. Currently, Mint is the distro of choice for many Linux users followed by Ubuntu and Debian. There are hundreds of distros available and you can’t possibly use or play around with all of them. Most of these distros are just offshoots of the more popular distros. If I were to narrow it down to just a few distros, I would go with these magnificent seven.

  • Mint – since it’s popular desktop. It’s based on Ubuntu.
  • Ubuntu – it’s my current favorite Linux server.
  • Debian – since Ubuntu and numerous others are based on Debian.
  • Fedora – it’s based on Redhat.
  • Centos – it’s basically Redhat without the support.
  • FreeBSD – Unix-like OS based BSD.
  • Slackware – it’s been around for a very long time.

How I Became a Mac OS user

Years ago, I got tired of Windows for numerous reasons which I don’t have the time to elaborate in this post. Eventually, I switched to Linux. It was new, exciting, and the opportunity to learn something entirely different was fascinating to me. When Ubuntu Dapper Drake came along, I went all in. That was my desktop of choice for a very long time.

After each Ubuntu release, I worked hard to get everything working from the flash player, media, and just about every tool that I needed, just to get the desktop to function the way I wanted to. After several years of Ubuntu updates and fixing the desktop, I got tired of it. It was an exercise I really didn’t want to do every six months.

I switched to the Mac OS because it it’s based on BSD, a Unix variant, which is familiar to me. In some ways, I can get still get down and dirty using the Terminal if I wanted to. The Mac OS for the most part, is a very stable environment. And everything worked at get-go. I’ve been a Mac OS user ever since.