Facetweet

The other day, I read that Twitter was trying to make its profile pages to look more like Facebook. A few weeks ago, I recall reading that Facebook was trying to make its real-time conversations look more like Twitter. I really don’t understand. So, why don’t these two tech lovers, both headquartered in the San Francisco Bay Area by the way, just get together and consummate. Then, we will have one giant social media called Facetweet. Think about all the time we will redeem if we post on just one social media platform. We will literally cut our social media time by half. Just think about how we will have more time to ourselves, how we could be more productive, and have a better quality of life. Maybe not.

TweetDeck’s New Design

Have you seen TweetDeck new design lately? I haven’t been using it for at least three years. Just wondering how it looks now, since Twitter has acquired TweetDeck in May of last year. I heard the creator and developer of TweetDeck, Iain Dodsworth, has received $40-$50 million dollars for selling his company to Twitter.

TweetDeck still looks familiar. The multi-column design is still there. You can easily switch back between the dark and light designs, which is a great idea by the way. Some people like white backgrounds. Some people like dark backgrounds.  Adding columns is very easy. You can practically add anything to each column.

You can add timelines, home, interactions, mentions, search, lists, trends, messages, favorites, activity, inbox, scheduled, @mentions and @me to any column that you desire. Sorting the columns is very easy. Simply click on the left and right arrows when you are adding or editing a column. The column will automatically slide left to right.

The only complaint I have is, I wished TweetDeck would have a responsive design.  I would love to see TweetDeck be responsive to any screen size. Having six columns might look good in a big monitor, but viewing it on smaller screen might involve moving the horizontal and vertical scrollbars.

Overall, I love the design. It’s very intuitive. You can easily add columns and customize content any way you want it.

Oh Noes Twitter Is Down

I haven’t seen this from Twitter in a while. It looks like Twitter is having major issues. It’s the end of the world I tell you. First was Google Talk at 4am this morning. Now, it’s Twitter. What’s next? Just think of all those missed tweets. How can we have the Olympics with Twitter being down.

I think the Olympics broke it. Well, at least the blogs are up and running. So, where’s the fail whale? I miss that guy. Instead, we have this page that I was able to capture. Now, we know the real cause of the problem based on the explanation below.

For some <%= reason %> it’s down. Well, that explains it. When do we figure the service will be back on? Of course, it will be back on <%= deadline %>. Everybody knew that. Come on.

HTTPS Is Now Default On Twitter.com

Twitter recently has turned on Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) by default to users who are logged in to Twitter.com. Once users are authenticated, they will be able to see the familiar HTTPS and an image of a secured lock (on Chrome) next to it in the browser’s address bar.

HTTPS provides encrypted communication and secure identification of network web servers. Encryption has been used for many years by payment processors, banks, and many other websites. It uses the TLS/SSL protocols to authenticate web servers. HTTPS uses port 443 by default, as opposed to port 80 for the standard HTTP.

The standard HTTP protocol is not secure and is subject to eavesdropping attacks, thereby letting attackers gain access to website accounts and sensitive information. To secure a website, administrators issue a public key certificate assigned by a trusted certificate authority.

By turning on HTTPS by default, Twitter is forcing users to use secure communication when logged in to Twitter.com. This is a positive move towards securing Twitter.com. In addition, Twitter still encourages users to use strong passwords with at least 10 characters, using a combination of letters and numbers.