Plain HTTP Will Be Branded Unsecure

Chrome 68 due in July 2018, will start labeling plain websites on HTTP as insecure. Google is saying that 68 percent of Chrome traffic now is secure. Getting certificates used to be an expensive proposition, but you can now get secure certificates for close to zero cost. If you’re site is still insecure, consider switching to HTTPS and getting a certificate.

Secure Your Dropbox Folder

If you are a Dropbox user, you might want to check your public folders. You might be inadvertantly sharing documents and photos with the rest of the world. By default, when you install Dropbox, there are two public folders that are publicly searcheable by search engines.

The most obvious shared folder is Public. That’s a no brainer. To my surprise, anything under the Photos folder is also searcheable by search engines. Here’s my case in point. Open this link. You will see thousands of search results of Dropbox users and their photos.

If you are going to use Dropbox to store photos and documents, do not use the Public and Photos folder. Unless you want to share it with the rest of the world. Place your photos and other documents in a separate folders instead.

If you want to share photos and documents, it’s better to share it privately with individuals, as opposed to having everyone access to your files. Credit to ghacks.net. Check out the comments on that article as well.

Securing Your Linux Desktop

Linux is secure. No doubt about it. Despite that widely accepted perception, if left unattended, it can be easily be as insecure as any other operating system, like, hmm, another OS which I will not mention. Yes, Linux out of the box still needs a room for improvement. There are some major things that can be performed to make Linux much more secure.

I just read a how-to tutorial on how to make your Linux Desktop secure from TechRadar.com. It’s an excellently written article with great invaluable points on how to make your Linux experience a secure and a pleasant one. The points are excellent. I agree with all, except one when it comes to upgrading every six months. I wouldn’t stop others from upgrading from one version to another every six months.┬áHere’s the article.