CSS Text Shadow

If you are a frequent visitor to the site, you may have noticed a couple of subtle changes to my blog the last couple of days. I’ve added text shadows on the titles and I also removed the text underline from the links. Today, this article will focus on how to add text shadows to your blog using CSS.

CSS Text Shadows give coders and web developers a tool to create text effects such as 3 dimensional effects, glowing effects and stencils. Text Shadows was originally proposed in CSS2, but really took off with CSS3.

Text Shadows is supported in most major browsers: Firefox, Safari, Chrome, Opera. The one major browser that’s missing in the list is Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. Text shadows is possible in Internet Explorer using JQuery. See link below.

Adding Text Shadows to your website, blog or page is quite easy. All it takes is adding a line of code to your existing CSS file. Consider the title above called “CSS Text Shadow” styled using <h2>. To make a text shadow, just add the following to your CSS file.

h2 { text-shadow: 2px 2px 2px #aaa; }

Text Shadows

The text shadow element contains 4 attributes. The first attribute is the x-coordinate. The second is y-coordinate. The third is the blur. The fourth is the color of the shadow. Negative values can be placed to simulate a light source that’s coming from the bottom.

h2 { text-shadow: 2px 3px 3px #aaa; }

Text Shadows

Here’s a couple of excellent articles about CSS text shadows:

CSS text shadows is a great tool for creating cool effects on your site. Just one advice. Don’t overdue it. Use it sparingly.

XMarks May Attract More Customers

When news broke out that XMarks was closing its doors, users like myself, and countless others who haven’t tried, nor heard of XMarks have suddenly become curious. What is XMarks?

When better news followed stating that XMarks users were willing to pay if XMarks was offered as a paid service, that got everyone’s attention. It’s great news for XMarks and good publicity, I might add.

If you’re not aware of XMarks, XMarks is a free (soon to be paid service) bookmarking service that allows users to synch bookmarks across multiple browsers. XMarks works in Firefox, Chrome, Explorer and Safari.

If you are cross-browser user (that sounded funny), XMarks is a great utility that you can add to your browser to access your bookmarks stored at XMarks servers.

Internet Explorer at 60%

Here’s the latest browser market share according to Net Applications:

  • Microsoft Internet Explorer: 60%
  • Mozilla Firefox: 25%
  • Google Chrome: 6.7%
  • Apple Safari: 4.7%
  • Opera: 2.3%

IE still has sizeable command of market, but it’s shrinking rapidly. It could be worse. Microsoft relishes on the fact that IE is included in every Windows OS product. To get Firefox and Chrome, you really have to get out of your way to download and install it. Safari is also standard in every Mac, but it’s also available in Windows.

Hardware Issues

My Linux desktop is sick. It’s having a hardware problem. It’s causing the kernel to panic. The mouse freezes and keyboard is flashing. At times, it causes the OS to shutdown. It doesn’t matter what distro I install. I tried the last 4 Ubuntu releases, Linux Mint 7, Linux Mint 8 and Fedora 12. I haven’t figured out yet if it’s a memory or a motherboard problem. I have eliminated just about everything else including power supply, CD, DVD, sound card and graphics card. It’s probably a memory issue. So now, I’m stuck on a Windows XP machine.

Interesting news today. The French and German government are sending out warnings to those who use IE as the fallout of the Google and China IE Zero Day security hack reverberates worldwide. Microsoft is directing users to use IE 8 instead. I say move to either Firefox, Safari or Chrome. I abandoned IE 5 years ago for the same reason. Some call for dumping IE now.

If you contemplating in interviewing with Google, better Google about what Google could possibly ask you during the interview, because Google, the company, tend to ask very tough interview questions. It’s interesting to hear about Google’s hiring policy, in that it focuses on super bright, intelligent people, which doesn’t seem to always translate to the best workers or workers with great interpersonal skills or better yet, workers with common sense.

Should Fedora release Fedora 13? For superstitious folks, thirteen is an unlucky number. Nevertheless, Fedora is forging ahead. Fedora 13 benchmarks are out, along with Ubuntu 10.04.

Google Chrome Tops Safari

Google Chrome has overtaken Safari. It’s now the number three popular browser, second only to Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox:

Google Chrome hit a milestone over the weekend when it became the third-most popular browser after Microsoft Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox, according to metrics firm Net Applications. It controls just 4.63 percent of the browser market, but Chrome has made significant inroads against competing browsers, such as the former bronze medalist Apple Safari.

It’s not hard to see why Chrome is gaining ground. Consider its recently launched versions for Mac and Linux, and the introduction of Firefox-like add-ons called extensions. There’s also the added hype around Google’s forthcoming Chrome OS.

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