Linksys WRT1900ACS

Linksys upgraded one of their top routers, the WRT1900. The latest version is called WRT1900ACS. This is the second installment with faster processors and faster results. The 2.4GHz band has a theoretical throughput of 600 Mbps, while the 5.0GHz¬†band has a theoretical throughput of 1300 Mbps. Here’s one good review from PCWorld.

DD-WRT To The Rescue

I got a Linksys WRT160N wireless router with a wireless problem. It’s not good when a piece of hardware no longer function the way it was intended to. I can’t get my laptop connected to it even if I’m literally 3 inches away from it. Instead of throwing away the router, I’ve decided to install a third-party firmware called DD-WRT.

It was a little unsettling at first because installing a third-party firmware can potentially brick a router if I don’t do it correctly. But, since the router is already useless, I’ve decided to install DD-WRT. Just as a word of caution. If you decide to install DD-WRT, make sure your router is supported. Read up. Do your homework. And follow instructions.

Suffice to say, the wireless router firmware upgrade was successful. The router is functioning nicely. DD-WRT will give you router functions you normally see in enterprise equipment, but the biggest improvement is, I now have a router with a much stronger wireless signal. Linksys sets their routers to transmit power at about 40mW. The DD-WRT firmware allows you to change the transmit power from 1-251mW. Mine is set to the DD-WRT default, which is about 70mW.

In addition to increase signal, you can also set the router as a wireless client, a wireless client bridge, a wireless repeater, and a wireless repeater bridge. Awesome. If you have an old router that’s misbehaving, you might want to look into the DD-WRT firmware. You can breath new life in an old wireless equipment.

Snapshot

Running Out of IPv4 Addresses

Apparently, IPv4 is running out of IP addresses according to NRO (Number Resource Administration). The number of available IP addresses is less than 10 percent and will run out by 2012. What this means is we will see IPv6 being implemented sometime next year. It’s up to ISP’s and router manufacturers to include IPv6 functionality to make the change. Local network administrators can switch their local networks now, independent of whether their ISP make a switch sooner or later. Most operating systems including Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Mac OS and Linux already support IPv6.