CSS Text Shadow

If you are a frequent visitor to the site, you may have noticed a couple of subtle changes to my blog the last couple of days. I’ve added text shadows on the titles and I also removed the text underline from the links. Today, this article will focus on how to add text shadows to your blog using CSS.

CSS Text Shadows give coders and web developers a tool to create text effects such as 3 dimensional effects, glowing effects and stencils. Text Shadows was originally proposed in CSS2, but really took off with CSS3.

Text Shadows is supported in most major browsers: Firefox, Safari, Chrome, Opera. The one major browser that’s missing in the list is Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. Text shadows is possible in Internet Explorer using JQuery. See link below.

Adding Text Shadows to your website, blog or page is quite easy. All it takes is adding a line of code to your existing CSS file. Consider the title above called “CSS Text Shadow” styled using <h2>. To make a text shadow, just add the following to your CSS file.

h2 { text-shadow: 2px 2px 2px #aaa; }

Text Shadows

The text shadow element contains 4 attributes. The first attribute is the x-coordinate. The second is y-coordinate. The third is the blur. The fourth is the color of the shadow. Negative values can be placed to simulate a light source that’s coming from the bottom.

h2 { text-shadow: 2px 3px 3px #aaa; }

Text Shadows

Here’s a couple of excellent articles about CSS text shadows:

CSS text shadows is a great tool for creating cool effects on your site. Just one advice. Don’t overdue it. Use it sparingly.

Internet Explorer at 60%

Here’s the latest browser market share according to Net Applications:

  • Microsoft Internet Explorer: 60%
  • Mozilla Firefox: 25%
  • Google Chrome: 6.7%
  • Apple Safari: 4.7%
  • Opera: 2.3%

IE still has sizeable command of market, but it’s shrinking rapidly. It could be worse. Microsoft relishes on the fact that IE is included in every Windows OS product. To get Firefox and Chrome, you really have to get out of your way to download and install it. Safari is also standard in every Mac, but it’s also available in Windows.

10 Best Free Linux Browsers

Linuxlinks.com gives a list of free Linux browsers:

  1. Firefox – Highly popular browser delivering safe, easy web browsing
  2. Chromium – Open-source project behind Google Chrome
  3. Opera – Popular graphical web browser and Internet suite
  4. Konqueror – KDE 4′s advanced file manager, web browser and document viewer
  5. Epiphany – Simple yet powerful GNOME web browser targeted at non-tech users
  6. Dillo – Small, stable, developer-friendly, usable, very fast, and extensible
  7. Arora – Simple webkit based web browser using Qt toolkit
  8. ELinks – Feature-rich program for browsing the web in text mode
  9. Lynx – Very fast and easy to use
  10. Flock – Built on Firefox, specializing in social networking and Web 2.0 facilities

My take: the first 5 browsers are definitely worth the look. Firefox is still the default and standard for Linux distributions. Chromium is making inroads. Wait, until Chrome OS comes out. There will be a big spike in Chromium’s use. Lynx is useful for scripting. Finally, Flock is just an interesting browser.

Opera Unite

Opera Software is offering Opera Unite, a web browser with a built-in small web server. Opera will allow users to share files, photos and music using Unite along with a half a dozen optional services. The services offered are file sharing, media player, photo sharing and a Facebook type of wall called Fridge. Users will have the ability to secure and password-protect a site, make it public or private. Only music with no pirate protection can be shared. Opera Unite is still in Alpha. It’s an interesting tack for Opera Software because while companies are betting on cloud services, Opera’s vision is to ditch the middleman, the so called third party services. Opera currently has 0.72% market share in the browser market. Will Unite make Opera gain a respectable market share?

Linux Browsers

I just searched Google and was amazed by the number of browsers available for Linux. There are at least a couple of dozen browsers actively in development. The most popular browsers are Mozilla’s Firefox, Konqueror, Galeon and Opera. Firefox and Opera have Windows versions available for download. They are free. Gratis!

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