Oracle Cloud Office

Oracle just joined the cloud, when it recently announced it will start Oracle Cloud Office, which allows users to create and edit documents without the need for desktop software. The Oracle Cloud Office 1.0 application can be viewed on smartphones, but lack the editing features. It’s also compatible with Microsoft Office and Open Office and is based on the open ODF format.┬áIt’s unclear whether Oracle plans to charge customers.

On a side note, Open Office which is also managed by Oracle, will release Open Office 3.3 which integrates well with Cloud Office. The Cloud Office can also connect with Oracle Business Intelligence, Oracle E-Business Suite, and Microsoft Sharepoint making it well positioned for enterprise use. From the looks of it, Oracle’s vision for the cloud just got clearer.

Now, it has two office suites. One is open-source that resides on the desktop. The other resides in the cloud and geared more towards the enterprise.

Microsoft Office 2010 Pricing

PC Mag details the latest Microsoft Office pricing structure:

Office Professional, $499 boxed or $349 via Product Key Card. Includes 2010 versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook, Publisher, Access, and Office Web apps. It also features premium tech support. It can be installed on two PCs concurrently.

Office Home and Business, $279 boxed or $199 via Product Key Card. Includes 2010 versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook, and Office Web apps. It can be installed on two PCs concurrently.

Office Home and Student is $149 boxed or $119 via Product Key Card. Includes 2010 versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, and Office Web apps. A Family Pack version can be installed on up to three PCs in a single residence.

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Do you really need Windows?

Do you really need to run Windows? It’s a question most computer users haven’t really thought about. Most users perform basic functions such as browsing the web, checking email, word processing or running a basic spreadsheet. What most people don’t realize is that these are functions that you can easily perform and run in Linux.

Most users are already familiar with the Firefox browser. If you’re not a Firefox fan, you can use Google Chrome which also available in Linux. If you’re still not happy with either one, you can try Opera, Konqueror, Flock, Galeon, Epiphany and even Lynx, a text-based browser.

There are a number of options in Linux for word processing. Open Office is pretty much standard in most Linux distributions. You can also use KOffice or AbiWord. The same goes for spreadsheets. The choices are many.

One benefit Window users will get from Linux is having a rock stable environment that’s free from viruses. In addition, Linux will cost you $0 dollars. It’s absolutely free. Compare that when buying Windows 7 upgrade or the full version.

When I converted to Linux, there was a transition period where I was running both Windows and Linux on my desktop. I dual booted for several months before moving strictly to Linux. Weaning Windows users might be the ideal approach for the switch.

Linux has come a long way. Linux is grown up. Linux has improve by leaps and bounds. If you’re still on the fence about converting to Linux, well, get off it. Give Linux a try. It’s definitely worth your while.