Use Nmap To Scan Your Network

The Nmap utility will scan devices connected to your network. Nmap is a free open-source utility used by network admins and anyone to explore, scan, secure and audit the network. For example, if your internal network is 10.10.10.0/24 network, you can use the following Nmap options to scan your network.

nmap -sP 10.10.10.0/24

The command above produces the following output:

As you can see, the nmap utility has found 8 devices connected to my network. It usually takes 30 seconds or so to scan the entire network. With the available data, I can now ping, ssh, or view the device via web browser if that service is available. Nmap makes troubleshooting the network that much more easier.

Just like most Linux utilities, nmap has a ton of options worth checking. Simply type -- help to read more options.

nmap --help

If you are a Windows user, the nmap utility is available for download.

For Ubuntu users, simply type the following to install

sudo apt-get install nmap

157825

My current Alexa ranking is 157825. The reason I brought it up was because Gizmodo posted an article today featuring 300,000 of the biggest websites visualized in a graphic with their icons. The result was based on Alexa rankings earlier this year.

As expected Google, Yahoo, YouTube and Facebook dominated the graphic. I was curious if I made the list. I wasn’t about to spend the whole day looking for it with a microscope, but I was glad to know that NMap has an interactive version. I did a quick search and here it is.

I was pleasantly surprised that I made the list. You can download the graphics if you like or ask for a 24×36 inch poster.