Linux Mint Website Hacked

Linuxmint.com got hacked today. Hackers were able to gain access to the website. They were able to direct users to download a modified ISO image that contains a backdoor. The hacked version potentially can steal user’s information. The hacked version only applies to the downloaded Linux Mint 17.3 Cinnamon edition. The Linux Mint blog say to always verify the checksum of the downloaded ISO file.

Best Linux Distros Available

Several weeks ago, I wrote on this blog about the Linux distros that people should try. I wasn’t far off on my assessment when I read this article by Digital Trends. As you can see, I stuck with the tried-and-true distros that are popular, as well as distros which represented the major Linux branches, and distros which people generally consider as very solid. As you can see, you can’t go wrong with Debian, Fedora, Centos, and Ubuntu. You throw in Mint, one the most popular distros nowadays, and you have a very good list.

Linux Distros to Try

DistroWatch.com has a list of Linux distros and ranks them based on popularity. Currently, Mint is the distro of choice for many Linux users followed by Ubuntu and Debian. There are hundreds of distros available and you can’t possibly use or play around with all of them. Most of these distros are just offshoots of the more popular distros. If I were to narrow it down to just a few distros, I would go with these magnificent seven.

  • Mint – since it’s popular desktop. It’s based on Ubuntu.
  • Ubuntu – it’s my current favorite Linux server.
  • Debian – since Ubuntu and numerous others are based on Debian.
  • Fedora – it’s based on Redhat.
  • Centos – it’s basically Redhat without the support.
  • FreeBSD – Unix-like OS based BSD.
  • Slackware – it’s been around for a very long time.

Install Google Chrome On Ubuntu and Mint

Installing the Google Chrome browser on the latest release of Ubuntu or Linux Mint has never been easy. Just head over to Google Chrome website and download the latest Chrome browser package. Google does a great job of detecting what OS you’re running. Google Chrome is available on Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora and openSUSE.

Download Chrome

Once you clicked on the Download Chrome button, you’ll have to choose whether you want to run 32 bit or 64 bit version of the Google Chrome browser. If you have 64 bit OS, you can take advantage of the added processing power by running the 64 bit version of Google Chrome.

GDebi Package Installer

Once downloaded, just head over to your Downloads folder. There should be a deb package. Mine was named “google-chrome-stable_current_amd64.deb.” Just right click and use GDebi Package Installer program to install Google Chrome. Click on the “Install Package” to begin the installation.

Menu > Internet > Google Chrome

If you have Google Chrome previously, you will see a couple of different buttons other than Install Package. You will see a “Reinstall Package” and “Remove Package” buttons. After the installation, the Google Chrome icon should be in the Menu system, most likely under the “Internet” sub-menu system.

Ubuntu Is Losing Steam

If you’ve visited Distrowatch.com lately, you probably noticed Ubuntu has slipped down to number 2 in terms of number of page hits on Distrowatch’s website. Linux Mint now holds the distinction of being number 1.

It wasn’t long ago, that Ubuntu held that prestigious position for months, perhaps years. What happened exactly to Ubuntu? Was it Unity, the new desktop environment that was introduced a couple of releases ago?

I think, a large part of the slide is indeed Unity, but it’s not solely the reason for the loss of its popularity. There are other issues. Ubuntu was already losing steam before Unity was first introduced.

You got to hand it to Linux Mint developers. They have done a great job of making Mint a solid distro that simply works out of the box with no fuss.

In the meantime, I went back to the two year old release, Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, or Long Term Support. It’s still supported until 2015. It runs the stable Gnome 2.3.

Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx LTS Release Candidate

I just downloaded the latest Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx Release Candidate. I am itching to get my hands on the upcoming release. I just couldn’t wait any longer. April 29 can’t get here any faster. I might as well check it out instead of waiting for 4 days. I am thinking about creating a second partition. I’m currently using Linux Mint 8 Helena. I don’t want to give it up. So, I will evaluate Ubuntu 10.04 to see what’s new.

Ubuntu Claims 12 Million Users

Ubuntu is now claiming 12 million users. Awesome! I use to be an Ubuntu user, but not at the moment. I parted ways with Ubuntu because I found a better alternative. I now use Linux Mint because of one reason, everything works out of the gate. No playing around with configuration, no adding of proprietary software, no more searching forums to make things work. Everything just works from the gitgo.

But, I have to say kudos to Ubuntu for the job well done. 12 million user base is a great accomplishment. But, I think Ubuntu can do better. If Ubuntu offers a distro where everything works out of the gate, and I mean everything, then the masses can latch on to it and never go back to their Windows ways. This is to me what’s missing with Ubuntu.

To Linux purists, proprietary software is a no-no, but to the average Joe, a system that simply works is the ideal.

Linux Mint 8 Review

I have been using Linux Mint 8 this past month. I love it. Why the switch from Ubuntu? Well, It’s not just the mint green color, although I think it’s an upgrade from Ubuntu’s drab brown. The Main Edition, the flagship release of Linux Mint, provides full multimedia support out of the box, meaning that you can listen to MP3’s watch DVD’s and view web pages that require Flash technology right after install. Simply put, it just works with minimal tweaking.

Why Mint? There are over 300 Linux distributions. Everyone has their own favorite. I chose Linux Mint because it’s based from Ubuntu. It’s something I’m very familiar with. I was a bit surprised to know that Linux Mint ranks third on the DistroWatch ranking trailing only Ubuntu and Fedora. Linux Mint 8 is my favorite at the moment, until something better comes along. Switching distros for me is easy since I keep all my documents in a USB stick. Reformatting a disk and installing a new distro takes only 15 to 20 minutes.

Here are a couple of Linux Mint 8 reviews from Linux Planet and DistroWatch.

Fully Qualified Server Name

If you are trying to restart an Apache server running on Ubuntu, Linux Mint or any other Ubuntu derived distro, you will get an warning message that your Apache server does not contain a fully qualified domain name.

Restarting Apache

sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 restart

Warning Message

* Restarting web server apache2
apache2: Could not reliably determine the server's fully qualified domain name, using 127.0.1.1 for ServerName ... waiting apache2: 
Could not reliably determine the server's fully qualified domain name, using 127.0.1.1 for ServerName [ OK ]

To fix this annoying message, you need to set the hostname:

Set Hostname

sudo hostname computername.domain.com

So, the next time you restart the Apache server:

Restart Apache

sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 restart

There are no more warning messages.

No More Messages

* Restarting web server apache2
... waiting                                                              [ OK ]