Install Google Chrome On Ubuntu and Mint

Installing the Google Chrome browser on the latest release of Ubuntu or Linux Mint has never been easy. Just head over to Google Chrome website and download the latest Chrome browser package. Google does a great job of detecting what OS you’re running. Google Chrome is available on Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora and openSUSE.

Download Chrome

Once you clicked on the Download Chrome button, you’ll have to choose whether you want to run 32 bit or 64 bit version of the Google Chrome browser. If you have 64 bit OS, you can take advantage of the added processing power by running the 64 bit version of Google Chrome.

GDebi Package Installer

Once downloaded, just head over to your Downloads folder. There should be a deb package. Mine was named “google-chrome-stable_current_amd64.deb.” Just right click and use GDebi Package Installer program to install Google Chrome. Click on the “Install Package” to begin the installation.

Menu > Internet > Google Chrome

If you have Google Chrome previously, you will see a couple of different buttons other than Install Package. You will see a “Reinstall Package” and “Remove Package” buttons. After the installation, the Google Chrome icon should be in the Menu system, most likely under the “Internet” sub-menu system.

Ubuntu Is Losing Steam

If you’ve visited Distrowatch.com lately, you probably noticed Ubuntu has slipped down to number 2 in terms of number of page hits on Distrowatch’s website. Linux Mint now holds the distinction of being number 1.

It wasn’t long ago, that Ubuntu held that prestigious position for months, perhaps years. What happened exactly to Ubuntu? Was it Unity, the new desktop environment that was introduced a couple of releases ago?

I think, a large part of the slide is indeed Unity, but it’s not solely the reason for the loss of its popularity. There are other issues. Ubuntu was already losing steam before Unity was first introduced.

You got to hand it to Linux Mint developers. They have done a great job of making Mint a solid distro that simply works out of the box with no fuss.

In the meantime, I went back to the two year old release, Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, or Long Term Support. It’s still supported until 2015. It runs the stable Gnome 2.3.

Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx LTS Release Candidate

I just downloaded the latest Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx Release Candidate. I am itching to get my hands on the upcoming release. I just couldn’t wait any longer. April 29 can’t get here any faster. I might as well check it out instead of waiting for 4 days. I am thinking about creating a second partition. I’m currently using Linux Mint 8 Helena. I don’t want to give it up. So, I will evaluate Ubuntu 10.04 to see what’s new.

Ubuntu Claims 12 Million Users

Ubuntu is now claiming 12 million users. Awesome! I use to be an Ubuntu user, but not at the moment. I parted ways with Ubuntu because I found a better alternative. I now use Linux Mint because of one reason, everything works out of the gate. No playing around with configuration, no adding of proprietary software, no more searching forums to make things work. Everything just works from the gitgo.

But, I have to say kudos to Ubuntu for the job well done. 12 million user base is a great accomplishment. But, I think Ubuntu can do better. If Ubuntu offers a distro where everything works out of the gate, and I mean everything, then the masses can latch on to it and never go back to their Windows ways. This is to me what’s missing with Ubuntu.

To Linux purists, proprietary software is a no-no, but to the average Joe, a system that simply works is the ideal.

Linux Mint 8 Review

I have been using Linux Mint 8 this past month. I love it. Why the switch from Ubuntu? Well, It’s not just the mint green color, although I think it’s an upgrade from Ubuntu’s drab brown. The Main Edition, the flagship release of Linux Mint, provides full multimedia support out of the box, meaning that you can listen to MP3′s watch DVD’s and view web pages that require Flash technology right after install. Simply put, it just works with minimal tweaking.

Why Mint? There are over 300 Linux distributions. Everyone has their own favorite. I chose Linux Mint because it’s based from Ubuntu. It’s something I’m very familiar with. I was a bit surprised to know that Linux Mint ranks third on the DistroWatch ranking trailing only Ubuntu and Fedora. Linux Mint 8 is my favorite at the moment, until something better comes along. Switching distros for me is easy since I keep all my documents in a USB stick. Reformatting a disk and installing a new distro takes only 15 to 20 minutes.

Here are a couple of Linux Mint 8 reviews from Linux Planet and DistroWatch.

Fully Qualified Server Name

If you are trying to restart an Apache server running on Ubuntu, Linux Mint or any other Ubuntu derived distro, you will get an warning message that your Apache server does not contain a fully qualified domain name.

Restarting Apache

sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 restart

Warning Message

* Restarting web server apache2
apache2: Could not reliably determine the server's fully qualified domain name, using 127.0.1.1 for ServerName ... waiting apache2: 
Could not reliably determine the server's fully qualified domain name, using 127.0.1.1 for ServerName [ OK ]

To fix this annoying message, you need to set the hostname:

Set Hostname

sudo hostname computername.domain.com

So, the next time you restart the Apache server:

Restart Apache

sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 restart

There are no more warning messages.

No More Messages

* Restarting web server apache2
... waiting                                                              [ OK ]

XRANDR Comes to the Rescue

What could be more frustrating than trying to install Ubuntu or Mint on a new CPU, motherboard, with a built-in graphics card and your display goes south. Here’s the scenario, after the initial flash screens, the screen goes blank. It seems that Xorg is using a screen resolution your monitor does not support.

Why is that? So frustrating. So, my older 19 inch Samsung monitor comes to the rescue. It seems to cope better than my 22 inch HPw220h monitor. The initial screen seems to be twice as big as the monitor supports, hence it doesn’t display properly on certain monitors.

There is one trick, well, a fix to make things all right again. XRANDR comes to the rescue. You will need to perform the following to get your Xorg displaying properly.

  • Hit Ctrl-Alt-F1. This will take you to the terminal screen.
  • Type in XRANDR -s 1024×768. This resets the screen a certain size.
  • Hit Ctrl-Alt-F7. This will take you back to XORG.

You can then make the Xorg changes and make it stick. Once I regained my screen, I was able to reconfigure Xorg to the resolution I wanted, 1680×1050 on my HP monitor.

To make my changes stick, I selected Preferences>Display. Say NO when prompted. Logout and Login.

The new Xorg configuration is now set.

It was a Memory Problem

Who would have thought? The source of my hardware issues this past two weeks was the RAM memory. As I previously wrote in my older post, I was experiencing a kernel panic. The symptoms were that my keyboard and mouse would locked up, the keyboard’s Caps Lock and Scroll Lock also flashed. The only recourse was to reset the computer.

Initially, I thought it was the power supply, then I thought the CD, DVD or floppy drives. I disabled the on-board sound. I even changed graphics cards. I should have tested the memory first. That was my gut feeling. I read on one of the forums that whenever there is a kernel panic that most likely, it would be a RAM issue. I should have done the memory test first.

The last couple days, I contemplated on buying a new motherboard, CPU and memory, but it can wait for now. Eventually, I need to upgrade.

Isolating the problem was great. It was an issue I have been battling for almost two weeks. Stupid me.

Currently, Frys sells 1GB DDR PC3200 400Mhz memory for $30. That’s the cheapest DDR without any rebates. I hate rebates.

I should really upgrade my system. I was looking at a package deal, an AMD Atlon X2 Quad 620 for $99, an Asus motherboard for only $40 at the Micro Center. It’s really a great deal. Throw in a 2GB DDR2 800Mhz RAM at $49 and I’m set to go, but I’ll wait for a little bit.

Move a Gnome Window with the Alt Key

Remember the days when you were running Windows, when a window would go off the screen. You lost control of it. You can’t move it. You can’t minimize or maximize it. All because the title bar is off the screen. Well, this happened to me today in Gnome. In Gnome! Can you believe it! Well, it’s a simple fix really.

Just hold down the Alt key and use the mouse to grab/move any part of the window!