Install Google Chrome On Ubuntu and Mint

Installing the Google Chrome browser on the latest release of Ubuntu or Linux Mint has never been easy. Just head over to Google Chrome website and download the latest Chrome browser package. Google does a great job of detecting what OS you’re running. Google Chrome is available on Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora and openSUSE.

Download Chrome

Once you clicked on the Download Chrome button, you’ll have to choose whether you want to run 32 bit or 64 bit version of the Google Chrome browser. If you have 64 bit OS, you can take advantage of the added processing power by running the 64 bit version of Google Chrome.

GDebi Package Installer

Once downloaded, just head over to your Downloads folder. There should be a deb package. Mine was named “google-chrome-stable_current_amd64.deb.” Just right click and use GDebi Package Installer program to install Google Chrome. Click on the “Install Package” to begin the installation.

Menu > Internet > Google Chrome

If you have Google Chrome previously, you will see a couple of different buttons other than Install Package. You will see a “Reinstall Package” and “Remove Package” buttons. After the installation, the Google Chrome icon should be in the Menu system, most likely under the “Internet” sub-menu system.

Ubuntu Is Losing Steam

If you’ve visited Distrowatch.com lately, you probably noticed Ubuntu has slipped down to number 2 in terms of number of page hits on Distrowatch’s website. Linux Mint now holds the distinction of being number 1.

It wasn’t long ago, that Ubuntu held that prestigious position for months, perhaps years. What happened exactly to Ubuntu? Was it Unity, the new desktop environment that was introduced a couple of releases ago?

I think, a large part of the slide is indeed Unity, but it’s not solely the reason for the loss of its popularity. There are other issues. Ubuntu was already losing steam before Unity was first introduced.

You got to hand it to Linux Mint developers. They have done a great job of making Mint a solid distro that simply works out of the box with no fuss.

In the meantime, I went back to the two year old release, Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, or Long Term Support. It’s still supported until 2015. It runs the stable Gnome 2.3.

Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx LTS Release Candidate

I just downloaded the latest Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx Release Candidate. I am itching to get my hands on the upcoming release. I just couldn’t wait any longer. April 29 can’t get here any faster. I might as well check it out instead of waiting for 4 days. I am thinking about creating a second partition. I’m currently using Linux Mint 8 Helena. I don’t want to give it up. So, I will evaluate Ubuntu 10.04 to see what’s new.

Ubuntu Claims 12 Million Users

Ubuntu is now claiming 12 million users. Awesome! I use to be an Ubuntu user, but not at the moment. I parted ways with Ubuntu because I found a better alternative. I now use Linux Mint because of one reason, everything works out of the gate. No playing around with configuration, no adding of proprietary software, no more searching forums to make things work. Everything just works from the gitgo.

But, I have to say kudos to Ubuntu for the job well done. 12 million user base is a great accomplishment. But, I think Ubuntu can do better. If Ubuntu offers a distro where everything works out of the gate, and I mean everything, then the masses can latch on to it and never go back to their Windows ways. This is to me what’s missing with Ubuntu.

To Linux purists, proprietary software is a no-no, but to the average Joe, a system that simply works is the ideal.