CSS Text Shadow

If you are a frequent visitor to the site, you may have noticed a couple of subtle changes to my blog the last couple of days. I’ve added text shadows on the titles and I also removed the text underline from the links. Today, this article will focus on how to add text shadows to your blog using CSS.

CSS Text Shadows give coders and web developers a tool to create text effects such as 3 dimensional effects, glowing effects and stencils. Text Shadows was originally proposed in CSS2, but really took off with CSS3.

Text Shadows is supported in most major browsers: Firefox, Safari, Chrome, Opera. The one major browser that’s missing in the list is Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. Text shadows is possible in Internet Explorer using JQuery. See link below.

Adding Text Shadows to your website, blog or page is quite easy. All it takes is adding a line of code to your existing CSS file. Consider the title above called “CSS Text Shadow” styled using <h2>. To make a text shadow, just add the following to your CSS file.

h2 { text-shadow: 2px 2px 2px #aaa; }

Text Shadows

The text shadow element contains 4 attributes. The first attribute is the x-coordinate. The second is y-coordinate. The third is the blur. The fourth is the color of the shadow. Negative values can be placed to simulate a light source that’s coming from the bottom.

h2 { text-shadow: 2px 3px 3px #aaa; }

Text Shadows

Here’s a couple of excellent articles about CSS text shadows:

CSS text shadows is a great tool for creating cool effects on your site. Just one advice. Don’t overdue it. Use it sparingly.

Internet Explorer at 60%

Here’s the latest browser market share according to Net Applications:

  • Microsoft Internet Explorer: 60%
  • Mozilla Firefox: 25%
  • Google Chrome: 6.7%
  • Apple Safari: 4.7%
  • Opera: 2.3%

IE still has sizeable command of market, but it’s shrinking rapidly. It could be worse. Microsoft relishes on the fact that IE is included in every Windows OS product. To get Firefox and Chrome, you really have to get out of your way to download and install it. Safari is also standard in every Mac, but it’s also available in Windows.

Firefox Nears 25 Percent of the Market

From Linux Journal:

Firefox, which has been growing steadily over the past several years, gained more than a quarter of a percentage point in March — a figure that may seem small, but considering the billion-plus users of the internet, represents millions of additional users. That increase brings Firefox’s share to 24.52%, within a mere half a percent of controlling one-fourth of the global browser market.

Since April 2008 (the earliest statistics available from Net Applications), Internet Explorer has lost nearly 20% of the market, dropping from over three-quarters in 2008 to well under two-thirds today.

Google Chrome Tops Safari

Google Chrome has overtaken Safari. It’s now the number three popular browser, second only to Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox:

Google Chrome hit a milestone over the weekend when it became the third-most popular browser after Microsoft Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox, according to metrics firm Net Applications. It controls just 4.63 percent of the browser market, but Chrome has made significant inroads against competing browsers, such as the former bronze medalist Apple Safari.

It’s not hard to see why Chrome is gaining ground. Consider its recently launched versions for Mac and Linux, and the introduction of Firefox-like add-ons called extensions. There’s also the added hype around Google’s forthcoming Chrome OS.

Read More

IE Explorer Losing More Ground

The latest web metrics from Net Applications, Inc. gave Internet Explorer a market share of just below 70%, a decrease of a few percentage points from last month’s numbers.

Meanwhile, Mozilla Firefox climbed above the 20% mark for the first time, while Safari increased to 7.1% and Google Chrome settled at 0.83%. The market share for browser use is available here.

I expect Internet Explorer use to diminish as the months go by as more and more home users will opt for Mozilla’s Firefox, Apple’s Safari or Google’s Chrome which is currently in Beta mode.

A large percentage of the 70% market share for Internet Explorer is corporate use. Corporations can’t easily depart from Internet Explorer due to legacy applications that only work with Internet Explorer.

As more of these applications are phased out and new applications becoming more compliant to run on any browser – not just IE, you’ll see more companies turning over to Mozilla’s Firefox.

Another factor is the economy. Belts will tighten, more corporations will opt for open source solutions if and when available. The Internet Explorer market share can dip further down under the current recession.

With IE 7 having been out for a while now and IE 8 looming in the horizon, many corporations will not upgrade to the upcoming release of IE 8. At least not right away.

Expect the trend to continue for IE Explorer. It will lose more market share in the upcoming months.

Internet Explorer In Ubuntu

Why would somebody in their right mind run Internet Explorer in Ubuntu. Before you shoot me, let me at least explain the reasons why. I get many support questions from people regarding the themes I’ve designed. The questions oftentimes are IE related. I either have to power my laptop or go to another computer to view the irregularity.

To avoid the hassles of firing up another computer (my desktop is solely running Ubuntu), I installed Internet Explorer 6 which runs under Wine on my Ubuntu 8.04 desktop. I used a simple script I found from 64 bit Jungle. The script calls for Wine and cabextract to be installed, followed by downloading the program, untarring the file and firing up the GUI installer.

The installation script was straightforward and a breeze. No hitches whatsoever. The GUI installer gives you several choices. I’ve decided to install both IE6 and IE7 beta. IE6 worked out of the box without any problems, while IE7 beta choked. The IE7 beta program fired up, but the browser was not rendering any web pages. It seems to be stuck in forever land.

So, the whole reason for this exercise is having the ability to check how web pages are rendered in IE6 without ever leaving Ubuntu. Running IE6 for just a few minutes makes me appreciate Firefox more than ever.