Sign Up for GMail Google Voice

This past week, Google released the integration of GMail and Google Voice which allows GMail users make free phone calls to anywhere in the US and Canada. At this time, the service is only available to US and Canadian users. Making international calls however, is subject to low rates which can be purchased online.

With GMail Google Voice, users can now make and receive free phone calls to any landline or wireless phones in the US and Canada until the remainder of the year. Google plans to make this service free as long as international calls can support the service. To sign up for Google Voice, go to http://voice.google.com.

You will be asked to choose a local telephone number from a list of numbers available. Once you secured a number, you will need to open up GMail to activate Google Voice. Click Settings -> Labs and enable the Google Voice module. To make a call within GMail, you will need to login to Google Chat.

The green phone will light up underneath your user name when it is ready. Dial a number and make your free phone call. GMail Google Voice works best with a headset with a built-in microphone. Enjoy.

Finally, here a video tutorial on how to make calls in GMail Google Voice.

GMail Undo Button

GMail has a new feature called Undo Send. You have 30 seconds to undo a sent email because GMail will hold the email for about 30 seconds before sending it out. This gives the sender plenty of time to ponder if the message was a good idea or not.

To use the feature, you will need to enable it. Click the Green Labs icon in the upper right corner of the GMail screen. Scroll down and enable the Undo Send feature. Give it a try. Send a message to a friend and try to pull it back before 30 seconds has expired.

CheckGmail

Google does not provide a Gmail notifier in Linux. Fortunately, there is CheckGmail, an alternative Gmail Notifier for Linux systems. It is fast, secure and uses minimal bandwidth via the use of Atom feeds. CheckGmail is a system tray application that checks a Gmail account for new mail.

When new mail is present the tray icon changes, an optional animated popup is displayed and a tooltip displays the number and details of new messages. Each message can be opened directly in a browser window, and many common Gmail operations (marking as read, archiving, deleting or reporting as spam) can be carried out on messages directly within CheckGmail, without the need to use the Gmail web interface.

If you are using Ubuntu, a simple command-line of “apt-get install checkgmail” will install the application for you. Start the application. Edit the CheckGmail Preferences. Enter your Gmail account and password. You are good to go.

Gmail IMap and Evolution

I had trouble setting up Gmail IMAP in Evolution in the past that the only way I fixed it was removing Evolution and installing Thunderbird. But, today is a very good day. I finally got Gmail IMAP to work in Evolution! This post is to document the Gmail IMap configuration in Evolution as a future reference. Hopefully, someone will read it and benefit from it as well. So, here we go. Let’s add a new account in Evolution by accessing the menu. Pull down the Edit > Preferences. Click Add to add new account.

Identity Tab

Let’s start with the Identity Tab. Enter the name of the account. In my case, I am simply calling it “Gmail.” Now, enter your full name and your email address. You can add a optional signature if you want.

Receiving Email Tab

In the Receiving Email tab, please select “IMap” server type. Enter “imap.gmail.com:993” as the server. The username is your full email address. Select “SSL encryption” for the secure connection type. The authentication type is “Password.” Checking remember password is optional if you want to avoid typing in the password everytime you access Evolution.

Receiving Options Tab

This section is really a personal choice. I like to be able to check messages every 10 minutes, show only subscribed folder as well as automatically synchronize remote mail locally.

Sending Email Tab

Please select “SMTP” for server type. Use “smtp.gmail.com:587” for the server. Use “TLS encryption” for secure connection. Select “Login” for authentication type. Use your full email account name for the username. Checking the remember password feature is optional.

The rest of the Tab folders are optional settings that you can set based on your own personal choice. That’s it. How I failed to get it to work previously was beyond me. Sometimes missing a single parameter can mean a whole lot of difference.