Mozilla Plans To Sell Advertising in Firefox

Mozilla plans to sell sponsored content, just a fancy word for advertising, in its new Tab pages. The New Tab pages will have some Mozilla-specific content, some popular websites, as well as some hand-picked sponsored content. Mozilla receives about $300 million per year from Google for making Google the default search engine for its Firefox browser. The deal is due up in December. Could it be that Mozilla is just trying to diversify its income stream just in case Google changes its mind.

Get The Latest Firefox Release in Ubuntu

This post will show you how to install the latest Firefox release on your Ubuntu desktop. Firefox has been cranking up its release schedule this past year. To keep up with the latest and greatest Firefox releases, this is what you need to do on your Ubuntu desktop.

The best way, and perhaps the easiest way, in terms of installing and updating software in Ubuntu, is to use PPA. It’s stands for Personal Package Archive. PPAs are collection of repositories that were not included in the original Ubuntu distribution.

When you add PPA repositories to our Ubuntu desktop, it allows you to update to the latest package releases, maintained by its owners. In our case, we will install the latest Firefox-stable PPA repository maintained by the Mozilla team.

To install the PPA, we simply run the following command from the Terminal. We do this only once.

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mozillateam/firefox-stable

Once you have the PPA in your list of repositories, you just run the upgrade and update commands every time there’s a new release.

$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get upgrade

The Mozilla team is usually pretty good with updates. It may take a day or two after the official Mozilla Firefox release, but nevertheless you will get the latest Firefox release update within reasonable time.

Firefox 10 Now Available

Firefox has been cranking out updates faster than a speeding bullet. It seems like it was only last year, we were using Firefox 3.6, then 4, 5 and now Firefox 10. Give it a year or so, Firefox 20 will be out. So, what’s new with Firefox 10?

There’s a new forward button that doesn’t show up until you actually need it, a full screen API that allow you to build a web application that runs on full screen, an anti-aliasing for WebGL is now implemented, and CSS3 3D-Transforms are now supported.

These are just a few of the latest features of the famous Mozilla browser. You can check out the release notes yourself. Better yet, download the new Firefox 10 browser, and try it out yourself.

Firefox 6 Is 20% Faster

Mozilla is cranking out new versions of Firefox like its coming out of a copy machine. It seems like it  every two weeks, a new version of Firefox comes out. Speaking of the devil, Firefox 6 is now out.

You won’t see anything different because there are no UI changes, but it will be 20% faster. So they say. Firefox 6 is available on PC, Mac and Linux. As of this writing, Mozilla’s website still displays Firefox 5. You may have to wait a couple of hours until the official announcement.

If you’re an Ubuntu user, just follow the instructions I wrote here for Firefox 5. This will work with future versions as well. By the way, I just tried. It’s not quite there yet. Just wait a couple of hours until the ppa repository is updated.

Is Firefox Going Too Fast For Its Own Good

Firefox specialist and consultant Mike Kaply questioned Firefox’s rapid release scheduling and its negative impact on businesses:

Case in point: Firefox 4 was only released in March. Now, three months later Firefox 5.0 is out in stable release. Hence, Mozilla has ceased supporting Firefox 4.

Kaply points out that this breakneck update schedule may “work for the average user” but “it doesn’t fly in [a] corporate environment, especially places like banks”. “Expecting a company to go through a full deployment cycle of their web browser every six week is simply ludicrous.”

It’s a valid point. Banks and corporate businesses should stay with version 3.6 then, while the rest of us get the latest and greatest Firefox. It just shows that it is difficult to make everyone happy. They say development was too slow. Now, it’s too fast. What gives.

Rapid development and releases will be the norm going forward. Businesses just have to adapt to them.

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Install Firefox 5 On Ubuntu 11.04

Waiting for Canonical to update Mozilla Firefox with your latest Ubuntu release may take a very long time. Are you tired of waiting? Take action. Install Firefox 5 now. Why continue to run Firefox 3.6 if you can get Firefox 5 now? Firefox has sped up their development. It’s time for Canonical to match the Firefox releases. The following instructions will install the latest stable Firefox release to your current Ubuntu distribution. The current Ubuntu release is 11.04 Natty Narwhal. The current Firefox release is Firefox 5. By the way, I’m still running Ubuntu 10.04 LTS and the instructions worked. This will also work for Ubuntu 10.10.

From the Terminal, run the following commands:

$ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mozillateam/firefox-stable
$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get upgrade

This will also update when Firefox 6 and Firefox 7 are released in the future.

Could Chrome Replace Firefox in Ubuntu

Reports have been confirmed that Firefox performance in Linux is considerably slower than in Windows or the Mac. So, why is Firefox performance slow in Linux? It seems to be a matter of priority. Less priority that is. Firefox developers have been focused on Windows, addressing issues where the majority of Firefox users are based.

Mozilla seemed to place less emphasis on Linux development. Mozilla is aware of these issues and are trying to fix them. Potentially, Canonical can replace Firefox with Chrome if performance continuous to be perceived as slow. Mozilla can potentially lose millions of dollars if this were to happen.

Mozilla receives millions of dollars from Google for making Google Search the default search engine for Firefox in Ubuntu. The growth of Firefox have slowed down considerably as Chrome continues to eat away the browser market share. I wouldn’t be surprised if Chrome becomes the default browser in the future, not only because of performance, but because it makes perfect sense.

After all, the Chrome browser is the centerpiece of the Chrome OS.

Firefox Losing Its Grip

Several weeks ago, I declared switching to Chrome on my PC and Linux desktops due to one thing, the speed of the Chrome browser was unmatched. Yesterday, I read an article stating that Chrome outgrew Firefox, IE and any other browser in the market, jumping 9% from usage in just last month.

If that’s not an indication that Firefox is losing its grip, wait until you read today’s article about Chrome, now being the number one browser used by Digg users who visit the site. When techies no longer use Firefox, it’s all the more reason to believe that Chrome has won the hearts of techies.

But wait, don’t abandon Firefox just yet. Mozilla will soon release Firefox 4 sometime in 2011. Will Firefox regain its luster?

Moving To Google Chrome

I’m a big fan of Mozilla Firefox, but I finally have made the decision to use Google Chrome as my default browser. I did it for just one reason. Speed. Everything just seems faster in Chrome. It’s just not my perception either.  Benchmarks after benchmarks have indicated that Chrome is the just fastest browser in the planet.

So, when Mozilla came out today with Firefox 4 Beta 7, I was a bit hopeful, but my hope was quickly dashed when it reported that Firefox 4 is still slower than Chrome. Don’t get me wrong, Firefox 4 is still considerably faster than it’s current offering, but just not fast enough compared to the current Chome release.

To help me with my decision, I was able to download my favorite plugin called Web Developer Tools to work in Google Chrome. I love this plugin. If you’re a web developer, it’s a must have. Unless something dramatic changes in the browser world, I’ll be on Google Chrome for a while.

Use Caution When Acessing A Public Network

There is an ad-on for Mozilla Firefox called FireSheep, which allow others to snoop on other people’s account in a public network. Users in networks such as hotels, airports and Starbucks are vulnerable when accessing their email, social networks and online banking.

This is all the more reason to be wary when accessing public networks. Online banking is definitely a no-no. Perhaps now, accessing your email or any of the social networks is also off the table.

If you must use a public network, use VPN to protect yourself from Firesheep. You can use your office VPN if you happen to have one. The other option is to use your home router, if you happen to have a router that supports VPN.