Owncloud 4.5

OwnCloud is an open-source file sharing and file storage cloud platform that’s similar to Dropbox, Google Drive, Box, and other cloud sharing services. The difference is, OwnCloud allows you to install your own cloud storage on your own server. You manage the server software yourself making your data your own. OwnCloud has vastly improved the past year. OwnCloud has added a desktop client for Windows, MacOS and Linux, as well as mobile apps for iOS and Android.

Much has changed since the last time I played around with OwnCloud. Instead of performing an upgrade of my previous installation, I’ve decided to just reinstall everything from scratch. OwnCloud now gives your three options to install the server software. You can install it from a tar archive, a Linux package, or you can use the Web Installer. I chose the latter. It turned out to be the simplest option.

You simply download the small installation file called “setup-owncloud.php.” You then upload the it to your web server and run the install script. You will be asked to supply a username and password. The installation file will then download the rest of the program and complete the installation for you. It takes less than a minute to complete the install.

Just a couple of things worth sharing. I opted for SQLite install. So, there is no MySQL database needed. There’s only one thing I want to modify. I want increase the default allocated space to something bigger. Other than that, it’s a functional file sharing service. It’s not as polished as Dropbox and Google Drive, but it’s not too shabby either. At least, you can sleep well knowing your data is your own.

Get Your OwnCloud

There are several free cloud services available out there. Dropbox, Google Drive, Ubuntu One, JustCloud, ZipCloud, to name just  a few. They’re all great. They all have one thing in common, they store and share files and documents on the cloud.

If there’s one thing that bothers people about cloud services, it’s privacy. People worry about placing sensitive data on the cloud. How about running your own cloud? Well, get your own cloud with OwnCloud. OwnCloud is an open-source cloud software solution that you can install yourself.

You can install it on your own desktop, your server at home, your VPS server on the Internet, or anywhere there is a PC or computer. You decide where you want it. The best thing about ownCloud, no one has access to your sensitive data. Just you.

I’ve been running ownCloud for about a month now. It’s great. I am able to upload and share any files that I want, from pictures, videos and documents.  I can access these files from any computer, from any location around the world. There is no need for me to carry a USB stick anymore. All I need to do, is access my browser and access my files online.

In addition, OwnCloud allows me to play music and movies online. It organizes my pictures into galleries. It has a calendar, contacts, and a host of other applications that can be installed with just one click of a button. So, get your own cloud with OwnCloud.

Get Extra Space from Dropbox

Dropbox is one my all-time favorite application. The file sharing application gives you the ability to synch several computers by simply dropping a file to a folder. All your other computers (Windows, Mac or Linux) that have Dropbox installed, will synchronize automatically and get the updated files.

When you join Dropbox, you probably selected a free account that came with 2GB of disk space. To increase space, you can refer friends, family and others to join Dropbox and you and your friend will get an additional 250MB of space. I’ve referred several friends and now have 4.38GB. It’s nothing compared to someone I read online that had 17GB.

While referral is great, there’s another easy way of getting extra space from Dropbox. If you connect your Twitter account with Dropbox, you’ll get an additional 128MB. If you connect with Facebook, it’s another 128MB. If you follow @Dropbox on Twitter, it’s another 128MB.

If you tweet how much you love Dropbox, it’s another 128MB. Hence, my tweet about Dropbox the other night. All in all, if you do all of the above, you’ll get an additional 640MB of free disk space. Mind you, these are services that you already have, since most people already have Facebook and Twitter accounts. All you have to do is activate your free disk space.

To get your free space, just login to Dropbox and access Dropbox for free. One more thing, if you haven’t joined Dropbox yet, use this link to join. You and I will get an additional 250MB for using that link.

Tonido

Access your desktop from anywhere using Tonido. Explore your Desktop, share files, music, manage your torrents, backup your data, listen to music, share photos, organize your work, create a blog post, and manage your own money. These are just a few things that you can do with Tonido. What are you waiting for? Create an account with Tonido now and access your files from anywhere.

Dropbox

Today, I finally got a chance to play around with Dropbox, an online file sharing service. Shared files are accessed online via a web browser or a mobile device or client software. The client software looks just like any folder.

The software automates the synchronizing of files and photos. The Dropbox works just like any other folder on your computer, but with a few differences. You can drag and drop move files around, just like you normally would in any folder.

Any files or folders inside Dropbox will get synchronized to Dropbox’s servers and any other computer linked to your account. Green checkmarks will appear on top of your files to let you know that they’re synced and up to date.

Your files are always safe. All data is transferred over SSL and encrypted with AES-256 before storage.

Dropbox keeps track of every change made to any of its contents. Any changes are instantly and automatically sent to any other computer linked to your Dropbox. The Dropbox clients for Windows, Mac and Linux all play nice with one another too!

Dropbox’s shared folders make it easy for you to share a bunch of stuff with other people. This makes Dropbox perfect for team projects, music/video editing, and much more. Easily share files just two clicks away. share photos. There is a 2gb limit.

Visit Dropbox to learn more about the service or watch this screencast.