Linux Nano Editor

In metric terms, nano means one billionth of a unit, or 10-9. Apple has a product called the iPod nano. In Linux terms, Nano is simply a terminal editor. If you’re looking for an alternative to the vi editor, then consider using Nano.

Nano is derived from the words Nano’s ANOther editor. Nano is an enhanced Pico clone, Pico being another Linux terminal editor. Nano is a little bit quirky in the beginning if you’re coming from the vi world. But, once you’re used to the editor, you’ll be glad you tried it.

In my opinion, I think you can do editing faster in nano than in vi, once you get used to all the controls. Here are several common and important controls within Nano that you should be familiar with: Crtl-O to save, Ctrl-X to quit, Ctrl-K to cut, Ctrl-U to paste. Ctrl-Y to page up, and Ctrl-V to page down.

Read up on the basics of the nano editor.


ShiftEdit is an online IDE for developing PHP, Ruby, Python, Perl, Java, HTML, CSS and JavaScript through FTP, SFTP and Dropbox. I recently started using ShiftEdit after seeing it from the Chrome Web Store. I’m using it at the moment to manage several of my websites.

ShiftEdit allows you to create and edit PHP, Ruby, Java, HTML, CSS and JavaScript scripts. ShiftEdit has a built-in SFTP support to manage your websites. Just supply your FTP credentials within ShiftEdit to manage your sites. ShiftEdit also has syntax highlighing, block tabbing, undo/redo, line numbers, as well as jump to any line number.

If you’re looking to manage your website via the browser, without the need for a file editor or FTP client, you should look into ShiftEdit. All your work is done via the browser. No more downloading and uploading files. No more editing offline. Changes are immediate.

ShiftEdit keeps tracks of your file changes as well with Revisions History. You can highlight several files and look at file differences. You can also bookmark files for easy access later. There are more features. Visit ShiftEdit if you’re interested.

Video Subtitles Editor

Most of us who make videos resort to our old Windows ways when it comes to editing videos, placing subtitles, etc. Well, there are several Linux applications that are available for free. shares with us several programs that do just that. They are: Ksubtitleripper, a KDE-based application, OGMRip and Avidemux.

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