RockMelt Browser Emerges

I heard RockMelt mentioned twice in two days. What’s RockMelt? RockMelt is a brand-new browser that’s designed around you and how you use the web. Curious? Yes, me too. Well, wait no more. You can sign up and get an early invitation.

From RockMelt’s blog

RockMelt does more than just navigate Web pages. It makes it easy for you to do the things you do every single day on the Web: share and keep up with your friends, stay up-to-date on news and information, and search. And of course, RockMelt is fast, secure, and stable because it’s built on Chromium, the open source project behind Google’s Chrome browser. It’s your browser – re-imagined and built for how you use the Web.

You can follow RockMelt @rockmelt as well as in Facebook.

Finally, here’s a couple of videos to whet your appetite.

Comodo Dragon

Yet another browser. Here’s an article from PC World.

Chromium is an open source spinoff of Google’s Chrome browser, which means that anyone can make their own version of Chromium, as the code is freely available. Chrome and Chromium are very similar and keep up with each other in versions; Chromium is more modifiable and Chrome is more closed. It’s all a matter of preference. Comodo Security Solutions, known for its suite of security software, has tossed its hat into the ring with Comodo Dragon. What separates Comodo Dragon from the other Chromium browsers–and Google’s proprietary Chrome–is the added level of security.

Comodo Dragon boasts what’s called “Incognito Mode,” which allows you to surf with all cookies turned off, no download tracking, and no other trace of your existence. This is handy for surfing over free public WiFi, where security is an issue, or in situations where you have to share a group or guest login. Instead of having to remember to delete your cookies afterward, as with a tracks eraser, Incognito Mode prevents cookies in the first place.

Read the rest of the article.

Diet Chromium OS

Google Chrome OS requires a 4GB USB stick. If you need a smaller version, check out Diet Chromium OS which need only 1GB. From the Yahoo article:

Many of the builds thus far have been targeted at specific hardware configurations, such as one made available by a Dell employee designed for the Dell‘s Mini 10V netbook.

The Diet Chromium build has a smaller footprint, but promises wider hardware support. Diet Chromium comes courtesy of a UK student and programmer known as Hexxeh. Hexxeh explains that he constructed the build in order to “fill a gap that hadn’t been filled.” His Web site offers instructions on how to install the lighter Chromium build on Windows, Mac and Linux machines.

Ian Paul will show you how to install a more standard build of Chrome OS right now.

10 Best Free Linux Browsers

Linuxlinks.com gives a list of free Linux browsers:

  1. Firefox – Highly popular browser delivering safe, easy web browsing
  2. Chromium – Open-source project behind Google Chrome
  3. Opera – Popular graphical web browser and Internet suite
  4. Konqueror – KDE 4’s advanced file manager, web browser and document viewer
  5. Epiphany – Simple yet powerful GNOME web browser targeted at non-tech users
  6. Dillo – Small, stable, developer-friendly, usable, very fast, and extensible
  7. Arora – Simple webkit based web browser using Qt toolkit
  8. ELinks – Feature-rich program for browsing the web in text mode
  9. Lynx – Very fast and easy to use
  10. Flock – Built on Firefox, specializing in social networking and Web 2.0 facilities

My take: the first 5 browsers are definitely worth the look. Firefox is still the default and standard for Linux distributions. Chromium is making inroads. Wait, until Chrome OS comes out. There will be a big spike in Chromium’s use. Lynx is useful for scripting. Finally, Flock is just an interesting browser.