Install Google Chrome On Ubuntu and Mint

Installing the Google Chrome browser on the latest release of Ubuntu or Linux Mint has never been easy. Just head over to Google Chrome website and download the latest Chrome browser package. Google does a great job of detecting what OS you’re running. Google Chrome is available on Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora and openSUSE.

Download Chrome

Once you clicked on the Download Chrome button, you’ll have to choose whether you want to run 32 bit or 64 bit version of the Google Chrome browser. If you have 64 bit OS, you can take advantage of the added processing power by running the 64 bit version of Google Chrome.

GDebi Package Installer

Once downloaded, just head over to your Downloads folder. There should be a deb package. Mine was named “google-chrome-stable_current_amd64.deb.” Just right click and use GDebi Package Installer program to install Google Chrome. Click on the “Install Package” to begin the installation.

Menu > Internet > Google Chrome

If you have Google Chrome previously, you will see a couple of different buttons other than Install Package. You will see a “Reinstall Package” and “Remove Package” buttons. After the installation, the Google Chrome icon should be in the Menu system, most likely under the “Internet” sub-menu system.

Google Chrome 19

Google Chrome 19 is now out. The latest release give users the ability to synch their open tabs across all devices. Whether they are on their desktops, laptops or Android devices, they can now share theiropen tabs across different platforms.

The only requirement is, you have to be logged in to Google Chrome to synch your open tabs. You can download Google Chrome 19 directly from Google Chrome’s website or update to Google Chrome 19 via the Tools menu within the Google Chrome browser.

The Reasons Why I Dont Use Internet Explorer

Every now and then, I use Internet Explorer just to see how an application behaves with the dreaded browser from Microsoft. The results at times are surprising, to say the least. Using IE usually involves using Windows, which I don’t use that often. But, I have my old, trusty Windows XP, running in Virtualbox.

Inside Windows XP, I have a slightly older Internet Exporer 7. I want to upgrade to IE9, but there is a slight problem. When I headed over to Microsoft’s website, I learned that I can’t run IE9 on Windows XP. Microsoft suggests that I upgrade to Windows 7. No thanks. So, the best I can do with this Windows XP, is go with IE8. I guess I can do that, but I need another computer to test IE9.

In the meantime, I decided to blog just a little. I logged in to WordPress using IE7. Guess what? WordPress complained that I’m using an insecure browser the moment I logged in to the WordPress Dashboard. The message is right up there on top of the page, inside a bright red background. You can’t miss it.

So, I decided to write a quick blog, and then the unimaginable happened. The IE7 browser disappeared. It’s gone in a puff of smoke, right before my eyes. Where did it go? It crashed! It’s a good thing, I pressed ‘Save Draft’ just moments before its disappearance. So, now I’m using Google Chrome to complete this post.

Oh, what fun. And I still have to test that dreaded application with IE7, IE8 and IE9. I can’t wait what’s in store for me.

Could Chrome Replace Firefox in Ubuntu

Reports have been confirmed that Firefox performance in Linux is considerably slower than in Windows or the Mac. So, why is Firefox performance slow in Linux? It seems to be a matter of priority. Less priority that is. Firefox developers have been focused on Windows, addressing issues where the majority of Firefox users are based.

Mozilla seemed to place less emphasis on Linux development. Mozilla is aware of these issues and are trying to fix them. Potentially, Canonical can replace Firefox with Chrome if performance continuous to be perceived as slow. Mozilla can potentially lose millions of dollars if this were to happen.

Mozilla receives millions of dollars from Google for making Google Search the default search engine for Firefox in Ubuntu. The growth of Firefox have slowed down considerably as Chrome continues to eat away the browser market share. I wouldn’t be surprised if Chrome becomes the default browser in the future, not only because of performance, but because it makes perfect sense.

After all, the Chrome browser is the centerpiece of the Chrome OS.

The Chrome Webstore

The Chrome Web Store is an online marketplace where you can discover thousands of apps, extensions and themes for the Google Chrome. To start exploring the store, visit https://chrome.google.com/webstore or click the store icon in Chrome’s New Tab page.

Of course, you will need to download and use the Google Chrome browser for the extensions and the themes to work. Browse the Google Webstore and discover programs you never thought existed. Finally, watch this video to learn more about the Google Chrome Store.

Chrome Web Store Is Just Around The Corner

Google Chrome 8 is just around the corner. Expect a Chrome Web Store to emerge along with the latest browser. The online store will be similar to Apple and Android stores, but built towards web users.

The online store is going to be an open marketplace where developers and millions of users will sell and buy web applications. Users will be able to download amazing web applications by way of the Chrome browser.

The web applications are going to be searchable. In addition, applications are going to be ranked by user reviews. For more information about the Chrome Web Store, watch this video from the 2010 Google I/O Keynote address on Day 1.

Firefox Losing Its Grip

Several weeks ago, I declared switching to Chrome on my PC and Linux desktops due to one thing, the speed of the Chrome browser was unmatched. Yesterday, I read an article stating that Chrome outgrew Firefox, IE and any other browser in the market, jumping 9% from usage in just last month.

If that’s not an indication that Firefox is losing its grip, wait until you read today’s article about Chrome, now being the number one browser used by Digg users who visit the site. When techies no longer use Firefox, it’s all the more reason to believe that Chrome has won the hearts of techies.

But wait, don’t abandon Firefox just yet. Mozilla will soon release Firefox 4 sometime in 2011. Will Firefox regain its luster?

Moving To Google Chrome

I’m a big fan of Mozilla Firefox, but I finally have made the decision to use Google Chrome as my default browser. I did it for just one reason. Speed. Everything just seems faster in Chrome. It’s just not my perception either.  Benchmarks after benchmarks have indicated that Chrome is the just fastest browser in the planet.

So, when Mozilla came out today with Firefox 4 Beta 7, I was a bit hopeful, but my hope was quickly dashed when it reported that Firefox 4 is still slower than Chrome. Don’t get me wrong, Firefox 4 is still considerably faster than it’s current offering, but just not fast enough compared to the current Chome release.

To help me with my decision, I was able to download my favorite plugin called Web Developer Tools to work in Google Chrome. I love this plugin. If you’re a web developer, it’s a must have. Unless something dramatic changes in the browser world, I’ll be on Google Chrome for a while.

XMarks May Attract More Customers

When news broke out that XMarks was closing its doors, users like myself, and countless others who haven’t tried, nor heard of XMarks have suddenly become curious. What is XMarks?

When better news followed stating that XMarks users were willing to pay if XMarks was offered as a paid service, that got everyone’s attention. It’s great news for XMarks and good publicity, I might add.

If you’re not aware of XMarks, XMarks is a free (soon to be paid service) bookmarking service that allows users to synch bookmarks across multiple browsers. XMarks works in Firefox, Chrome, Explorer and Safari.

If you are cross-browser user (that sounded funny), XMarks is a great utility that you can add to your browser to access your bookmarks stored at XMarks servers.

Google Chrome 6 is Fast

This past week, the Google Chrome browser was updated to version 6. If you haven’t updated, just go to About Google Chrome and click on the Update button.

One thing that is very noticeable with Google Chrome 6 is speed. I mean lots of it. It’s an amazingly fast browser. Coming from Firefox you’ll feel like you’ve gone to warp speed.

The minimalist design of the browser is a vast improvement over previous versions. The access menu is just a single wrench that pretty much does everything. That’s the idea behind the concept of having one menu. Simplicity.

Even if you don’t like Google Chrome for whatever reason, Google Chrome version 6 will offer you something that another browser can’t deliver. Speed. Now, who doesn’t want a fast browser.