Firefox 4 Promises To Be Fast

Mozilla promises to have a “super-duper fast” browser when Firefox 4 surfaces sometime in October 2010. Mozilla Firefox faces tough competition from the lightning-speed Google Chrome, who have been outpacing all competition in terms of browser market share.

To reverse the market slide, Mozilla Firefox 4 will need to match Chrome’s speed and offer a few more enhancements. Support for HTML5, 64-bit computing, a sleeker and a simpler interface will certainly help. Mozilla will also add dedicated application tabs and the ability to install add-ons without restarting the browser.

Beta releases of Firefox 4 will be available sometime next month. An October release is still five months away and Mozilla does not guarantee it will meet the release date. Firefox 4 release date can possibly slip by a month or two.

In the meantime, Google Chrome will continue eat away the browser market share. Experts are saying Firefox 4 is market-neutral meaning it will probably not have any lasting impact to the market share when released.

Comodo Dragon

Yet another browser. Here’s an article from PC World.

Chromium is an open source spinoff of Google’s Chrome browser, which means that anyone can make their own version of Chromium, as the code is freely available. Chrome and Chromium are very similar and keep up with each other in versions; Chromium is more modifiable and Chrome is more closed. It’s all a matter of preference. Comodo Security Solutions, known for its suite of security software, has tossed its hat into the ring with Comodo Dragon. What separates Comodo Dragon from the other Chromium browsers–and Google’s proprietary Chrome–is the added level of security.

Comodo Dragon boasts what’s called “Incognito Mode,” which allows you to surf with all cookies turned off, no download tracking, and no other trace of your existence. This is handy for surfing over free public WiFi, where security is an issue, or in situations where you have to share a group or guest login. Instead of having to remember to delete your cookies afterward, as with a tracks eraser, Incognito Mode prevents cookies in the first place.

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Whole Web is the OS of the future

This is according to Tim O’Reilly. I agree. In the future, everything will revolve around the browser and the whole web. The browser will essentially become the main interface to the operating system. From cnet news.

Open-source developers and businesses are focused on the wrong opportunity, according to industry luminary Tim O’Reilly. The future isn’t programming for Linux or MySQL. The future is programming for the “whole Web.”

And it threatens to be controlled by open-source savvy, data-rich companies like Google.

On Wednesday in San Francisco, O’Reilly closed the first day of the Open Source Business Conference by shaking up some comfortable assumptions of the open-source commercial ecosystem, which has tended to focus on commoditizing established markets with low-cost, high-value distribution, all driven by open-source licensing.

IE9 Beta

Microsoft IE9 “Platform Preview” is now available for download. It doesn’t have the all the features revealed at the moment, but we hope it will support web standards CSS3 and HTML5. From the looks of it, IE9 will not run on Windows XP. It requires at least a Vista SP2 OS. Microsoft engineers think the browser is going to be “crazy” fast. I don’t know what that means, but we will just have to wait and see.

Google Chrome Tops Safari

Google Chrome has overtaken Safari. It’s now the number three popular browser, second only to Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox:

Google Chrome hit a milestone over the weekend when it became the third-most popular browser after Microsoft Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox, according to metrics firm Net Applications. It controls just 4.63 percent of the browser market, but Chrome has made significant inroads against competing browsers, such as the former bronze medalist Apple Safari.

It’s not hard to see why Chrome is gaining ground. Consider its recently launched versions for Mac and Linux, and the introduction of Firefox-like add-ons called extensions. There’s also the added hype around Google’s forthcoming Chrome OS.

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