Chrome 45

Are you ready for a faster browser? Chrome 45 delivers. There are a ton of improvements and it uses less power as well.

From PCMag:

The new Chrome does more than just browse the Internet, though. It now detects if your computer is running low on resources, and automatically stops restoring tabs in an effort to save memory. Just click to refresh later, if necessary.

Google has also trained Chrome to identify when a webpage isn’t busy, and use that free time to clean up unused memory.

“In practice we found that this reduced website memory usage by 10 percent on average, but the effect is even more dramatic on complex Web apps,” product manager Ryan Schoen wrote in a blog post.

Read the rest of the article.

Opera Browser Maker On Sale

The makers of the Opera browser is considering selling the company due to interest from several companies. The Opera browser, while innovative at times, they were the first one to implement tabs, have never been able to get a large share of the market. It’s currently standing fifth behind the more popular browsers on the personal computers market, and a shrinking share on the mobile market as well. Read the rest of the article.

Mozilla Plans To Sell Advertising in Firefox

Mozilla plans to sell sponsored content, just a fancy word for advertising, in its new Tab pages. The New Tab pages will have some Mozilla-specific content, some popular websites, as well as some hand-picked sponsored content. Mozilla receives about $300 million per year from Google for making Google the default search engine for its Firefox browser. The deal is due up in December. Could it be that Mozilla is just trying to diversify its income stream just in case Google changes its mind.

Get The Latest Firefox Release in Ubuntu

This post will show you how to install the latest Firefox release on your Ubuntu desktop. Firefox has been cranking up its release schedule this past year. To keep up with the latest and greatest Firefox releases, this is what you need to do on your Ubuntu desktop.

The best way, and perhaps the easiest way, in terms of installing and updating software in Ubuntu, is to use PPA. It’s stands for Personal Package Archive. PPAs are collection of repositories that were not included in the original Ubuntu distribution.

When you add PPA repositories to our Ubuntu desktop, it allows you to update to the latest package releases, maintained by its owners. In our case, we will install the latest Firefox-stable PPA repository maintained by the Mozilla team.

To install the PPA, we simply run the following command from the Terminal. We do this only once.

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mozillateam/firefox-stable

Once you have the PPA in your list of repositories, you just run the upgrade and update commands every time there’s a new release.

$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get upgrade

The Mozilla team is usually pretty good with updates. It may take a day or two after the official Mozilla Firefox release, but nevertheless you will get the latest Firefox release update within reasonable time.

Firefox 10.0.1 Update Fixes Critical Bug

If you set Firefox for automatic updates, one way you can tell if Firefox has been updated is, it always require that you restart your browser. Firefox 10 was updated over the weekend to version 10.0.1 to fix a critical bug that can potentially be exploited by attackers. The bug also affects Firefox ESR (Extended Support Release), Thunderbird and SeaMonkey.

The security hole is within nsXBLDocumentInfo::ReadPrototypeBindings.

Mozilla developers Andrew McCreight and Olli Pettay found that ReadPrototypeBindings will leave a XBL binding in a hash table even when the function fails. If this occurs, when the cycle collector reads this hash table and attempts to do a virtual method on this binding a crash will occur. This crash may be potentially exploitable.

You can force Firefox to update or just wait until you’re prompted. Since it’s critical, it’s probably a good idea to force an update. You can usually find it on About > Apply Upgrade.

In addition, there’s an interesting article speaking of Firefox’s impending demise. Personally, I wouldn’t call Firefox dead. It’s just that Chrome and others are making it the browser war very competitive. It’s a good thing. A little competition between browsers is good for everyone.