Install Alsa Audio Driver on Ubuntu

I recently upgraded to the latest version of Ubuntu, which is currently version 12.04. Version 12.10 is just a little over than a month away from being released. With my Ubuntu 12.04 install, I was experiencing some crashing issues with the Unity desktop which drove me nuts. I ended up taking some extreme measures.

I went and installed Xubuntu instead of Ubuntu. Xubuntu uses the Xfce desktop interface. It’s much simpler and quite stable, except for the sound. Why can’t I get a problem-free distro for once. The default PulseAudio audio driver in Xubuntu was stuttering, especially when playing Youtube videos. So, I ended up removing the Pulseaudio and installing Alsa instead.

So, here are the steps I took to get my sound working.

sudo apt-get remove --purge alsa-base pulseaudio
$ sudo apt-get install alsa

I also had to edit the /etc/modprobe.d/alsa-base.conf file. Add this line at the end of the file.

options snd-hda-intel model=generic

Save and reboot.

Things To Fix After Each Kernel Update

Every now and then, your running Linux distro will receive a kernel update. It’s a normal part of running a Linux distro, or any OS for that matter. Mac OS and Windows perform updates as well. Unfortunately in Linux, there are certain things that break after each kernel update. It’s annoying as all get out, but its a small price to pay for running a secure desktop. In this article, I will list 3 things that need fixing, and their solutions, after each kernel update.

Fix Virtualbox

sudo /etc/init.d/vboxdrv setup

Fix Alsa

sudo apt-get install module-assistant
sudo m-a update
sudo m-a prepare
sudo m-a a-i alsa

Fix Webcam

sudo rmmod uvcvideo
sudo modprobe uvcvideo

I rather not to do this after each upgrade, but it’s a fact of life in the Linux world. It’s a good thing, it doesn’t happen very often. Perhaps, in the future, when Linux becomes perfect, or near perfect, this unnecessary exercise can all be avoided all together.

Fix Ubuntu Sound With Module Assistant

I lost the sound on my Ubuntu desktop earlier tonight. I’m not exactly sure what caused it to stop suddenly. Anyhow, here’s the fix. I’m running Ubuntu 10.04 LTS. I did a little digging around and found one great solution that I would like to share. I’m sharing it, so others can benefit as well.

The solution needs the help of module-assistant, a command-line tool for handling module-source packages specifically for Debian-based distros, which Ubuntu is. Module-assistant will help users build and install module packages for custom kernels.

To apply the fix, you must first install Module Assistant. The command line is abbreviated as m-a. You will need to run update first, followed by prepare, and then run the auto-install of the alsa sound drivers. The series of commands below should do the trick. You will need to reboot after the install.

sudo apt-get install module-assistant
sudo m-a update
sudo m-a prepare
sudo m-a a-i alsa