Apple Faulty AC Adapters

It’s not often that Apple recall its products, but the faulty AC adapters has the potential to cause harm due to overheating of the plugs. Countries that are affected are Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Continental Europe, New Zealand and South Korea. There have been 12 incidents reported worldwide so far. The recall does not affect the U.S., Canada, China, Hong Kong, Japan, or the U.K. But Apple says the faulty AC plugs are also in the World Travel Adapter Kit.

Zoho Mail Setup

If you have an email account with Zoho, you can setup your email with IMAP using these settings.

Incoming Server Settings:
Incoming Server Name: imap.zoho.com
Port: 993
Require SSL: Yes

Outgoing Server Settings:
Outgoing Server Name: smtp.zoho.com
Port: 465 with SSL or
Port: 587 with TLS
Require Authentication: Yes

Zero Day Flaw

Millions of Linux servers and Android devices were hit with a zero-day flaw today.

What is zero-day flaw? From pctools.com:

A zero day vulnerability refers to a hole in software that is unknown to the vendor. This security hole is then exploited by hackers before the vendor becomes aware and hurries to fix it—this exploit is called a zero day attack. Uses of zero day attacks can include infiltrating malware, spyware or allowing unwanted access to user information. The term “zero day” refers to the unknown nature of the hole to those outside of the hackers, specifically, the developers. Once the vulnerability becomes known, a race begins for the developer, who must protect users.

From zdnet.com. The issue today was:

A new, previously undiscovered flaw that allows an attacker to escalate local user privileges to the highest “root” level is said to hit “tens of millions” of Linux PCs and servers. Because some of the code is shared, the zero-day flaw also affects more than two-thirds of all Android devices. The flaw, said to date back to 2012, affects Linux kernel versions 3.8 and higher, which extends to devices running Android KitKat 4.4 and higher. The vulnerability is in the keyring facility, baked into the core of the Linux software. If exploited, an attacker would be able to execute code on the Linux kernel, and extract cached security data, which can include in some cases encryption and authentication keys.

Read the rest of the article from ZDNet.

Test Tube Burgers

Test tube burgers. Would you eat one? From PCMag:

Imagine you are a vegetarian. You became one in college, briefly experimented with veganism, but then settled down and simply cut meat out of your diet. You did so for ethical reasons; you just couldn’t stand the thought of the way animals were mistreated in the factory farming system. Later you learned this same industrial farming system is also one of the largest contributors to greenhouse gases.

Now imagine instead you are a code-at-all-costs kind of developer. You sit at your computer and grind out lines of code to execute for your clients or to realize your big idea. You could care less about where your food comes from as long as it gives you the energy to push through and get the job done.

Now we have something both vegetarians and coders might enjoy: the Frankenburger. It looks, smells, and tastes like the real thing, only this burger was grown in a test tube. How about a similarly derived steak? Or salmon? Or even the whole hamburger, bun and all?

NY Introduces Bill To Ban Sale Of Encrypted Smartphones

From Loopinsight.com:

Any smartphone that is manufactured on or after January first, two thousand sixteen, and sold or leased in New York, shall be capable of being decrypted and unlocked by its manufacturer or its operating system provider. This means the mere threat of this law will have a chilling effect on iPhone sales. If someone sells an iPhone built this year, they are subject to massive fines ($2500 per phone) on the off chance that the bill passes.

Robots Will Replace 5 Million Workers By 2020

From Reuters as reported by Huffington Post:

Disruptive labor market changes, including the rise of robots and artificial intelligence, will result in a net loss of 5.1 million jobs over the next five years in 15 leading countries, according to an analysis published in Davos on Monday.

The projection by the World Economic Forum (WEF), which is holding its annual meeting in the Swiss ski resort this week, assumes a total loss of 7.1 million jobs, offset by a gain of 2 million new positions.

The 15 economies covered by the survey account for approximately 65 percent of the world’s total workforce.