Chip $9 Computer

Meet Chip, the $9 computer which will be available sometime in 2016. Chip is based on ARM-based processor at 1Ghz, 512MB RAM and 4GB of storage. It has one USB port and a micro-USB port to power the unit. For display, it will have HDMI port. For just $9, it makes the Raspberry Pi look very expensive.

Two Month Wait For iWatch

I read there’s a two month wait for the iWatch. That’s a long time to wait for an order. I’m not sure if Apple purposely designed this to create demand or maybe there are manufacturing issues indeed. Probably the latter. Nevertheless, it’s a long time to wait.

Linux Distros to Try

DistroWatch.com has a list of Linux distros and ranks them based on popularity. Currently, Mint is the distro of choice for many Linux users followed by Ubuntu and Debian. There are hundreds of distros available and you can’t possibly use or play around with all of them. Most of these distros are just offshoots of the more popular distros. If I were to narrow it down to just a few distros, I would go with these magnificent seven.

  • Mint – since it’s popular desktop. It’s based on Ubuntu.
  • Ubuntu – it’s my current favorite Linux server.
  • Debian – since Ubuntu and numerous others are based on Debian.
  • Fedora – it’s based on Redhat.
  • Centos – it’s basically Redhat without the support.
  • FreeBSD – Unix-like OS based BSD.
  • Slackware – it’s been around for a very long time.

Avast 2015

There are quite a few antivirus software out there that do the job. Of all the software that is out there, I recommend Avast 2015. You can certainly use the Avast Free Antivirus, but I recommend Avast Premiere if you want extra protection. If you happen to get a virus or malware running on your computer, you can use Avast to scan your drive. If that doesn’t fix it, I also recommend that you install MalwareBytes and Ad-Aware software. These trifecta of antivirus software usually takes care of the job.

Windows 10 Forever

Microsoft mentioned the other day that Windows 10 is going to be the last Windows version. No future versions like Windows 11, for example. Future updates will be applied on an ongoing manner. Based on Microsoft’s history of OS releases, they seem to do well every third OS release. The ones that fall in between tend to be really bad. With this new approach, will we see faster updates to Windows. Will we see major updates or just minor ongoing tweaks. It will be interesting to see how Microsoft will manage this new approach. Read more from BBC.