Microsoft Windows 10 Enterprise

According to ZDNet, Microsoft is making the Windows 10 Enterprise edition available to business users for $7 per user per month, or $84 per user per year. The licenses are going to be available through Microsoft resellers. There will be two versions: E3 and E5.

Secure Productive Enterprise E3 — the bundle formerly named “Enterprise Cloud Suite” — will include Windows 10 Enterprise E3, Office 365 E3, and Enterprise Mobility + Security E3. (Enterprise Mobility + Security is the bundle formerly known as Enterprise Mobility Suite, if you’re still with me here.) There also will be a Secure Productive Enterprise E5 bundle, which will come with Windows 10 Enterprise E5, Office 365 E5, and Enterprise Mobility + Security E5.

ownCloud vs Nextcloud

ownCloud and Nextcloud are essentially the same for now. Up to about to about ownCloud 9.0 mainly because they share the same code base and history. With ownCloud 9, users can access both for the next two year, since the end of life ownCloud 9 is 18 months. After that users will need to decide which one to take. It is a fork on the road after all.

What will be the difference between projects?

According to ownCloud forums:

ownCloud GmbH focuses on the file sharing feature. The community provides additional apps (calendar, contacts, bookmarks, news). However, the company’s developers helped to build some of the apps (calendar, contacts). The enterprise version contains a number of exclusive features that are not available in the community version (Shibboleth authentication, File Drop, File Firewall, Auto-Tagging).

Nextcloud doesn’t exclusively focus on file sharing, they also provide support for apps such as the popular calendar, contacts app, and a communication platform (Spreed.ME). There won’t be enterprise-only apps. Enterprise users will benefit from professional support.

Linux Distros Dropping 32 Bit Support

Ubuntu plans to drop 32-bit support in 2018 with the release of Ubuntu 18.10. Fedora has stopped using 32-bit on its server offering as of Fedora 24. They still support 32-bit for the desktop. I imagine other Linux major distribution will follow suit as older hardware eventually are phased out.

Netflix Raising Price To $9.99

Starting August 3, 2016, I received a note from Netflix that they are raising my price to $9.99. They do give you some options if you don’t like the offer. Current Netflix users do have 3 choices, they can go with the (1) Basic Plan for $7.99, (2) HD Plan for $9.99, (3) or the Ultra HD Plan for $11.99.

Interestingly enough, there’s already a class-action suit against the price increase accusing Netflix that it has breached their contract. The original promise was that Netflix users can keep their current contract for a lifetime as long as that user does not suspend their account.

Google Calendar

Several news reports are coming in that Google Calendar was down this morning for two hours. I use Google Calendar, but I didn’t notice and was unaffected by the downtime. I guess I don’t use it often enough. However, many people use Google Calendar for personal and for work since it integrates well with mobile devices and other apps. Thankfully, the downtime was minimal without any loss of data.

Google Undersea Cable

After two years of construction, Google Undersea Cable between the West Coast of the United States and Japan is now complete. Located between Oregon and in Chiba and Mei prefectures in Japan, the 5600 mile connection has a bandwidth of 60 terabytes per second. One terabyte is 1000 gigabytes. Read from PCMag.