WordPress 4.5

WordPress 4.5 was released 3 days ago on April 12, 2016. The latest version contains improvements giving users the ability to perform inline link editing and other formatting formats. Type in three dashes to create a new page. Use back ticks to highlight your code within your posts. You can also get live responsive views within WordPress Dashboard, add custom logos, and many more features.

If you’re not using WordPress, give it a try.

WordPress.com Desktop App

If you have a blog at WordPress.com, you can now download a WordPress desktop app that’s available for the Mac. It’s similar to the Slack desktop application. The WordPress desktop app is very similar to the WordPress.com’s Dashboard. In fact, you’ll forget sometimes that you’re using the desktop app, except that you’re constantly reminded because there are no page refreshes. All updates are done behind the scenes. With this improvement, WordPress.com looks and feels like a modern web app. It’s WordPress way of saying, we can keep up with newcomers such as Medium. There are currently no plans to make this app available for the WordPress.org users.

Wired.com Revamped

Here’s how Wired.com revamped its own website. It started last year with the under-the-radar project when they migrated 17 active blogs into one WordPress install. The redesign took the approach of focusing on the responsive and mobile first perspective. In addition, Wired.com also started using Amazon Web Services and its content delivery network, as well as using Varnish for its caching.

Wired.com stack looks like this. WordPress PHP, Stylus for CSS, Vanilla JavaScript and jQuery, Coming soon: React.js, and JSON API. For deployment, Wired.com uses Vagrant, Gulp for task automation, Git hooks, Linting (check out stylint written by our own Ross Patton), GitHub and Jenkins.

Blog Revival

Hello! I just came up with a new theme. Nothing fancy. No images. No galleries. Just plain old text. It looks like a blog design circa 2005. One thing for sure though, it’s fast since there’s not much overhead. This theme is based on the _s framework, a good starter theme kit developed by the WordPress development team themselves. How about that! If you’re interested in learning how the WordPress theme is constructed, download the underscore theme and study its code. You’ll be surprised what you’ll see. You’ll learn quite a bit by analyzing how this theme is constructed. Anyways, I think it’s time to revive this old crusty blog. It’s time to breathe some new life into it. You are probably asking, “where have you been?” Well, I’ve been concentrating on all my other blogs for the last several months. I just didn’t have the cycles to maintain this blog among all the other web projects. So maybe, a new theme will jumpstart the old blog. We shall see, indeed!

Twenty Twelve Title Contain No Spaces

There is a conflict between the Twenty Twelve WordPress and the All in One SEO Pack plugin. When the plugin is installed and you happen to be using the Twenty Twelve theme, the result is, there will be no space between your site title and blog title. You’ll notice this if you look at the title bar of your browser. After a couple of searches, I found a fix online. It involves editing the Twenty Twelve functions.php file and commenting out line 185 which contains the code below.

You will need to change:

add_filter( 'wp_title', 'twentytwelve_wp_title', 10, 2 );

and comment out:

// add_filter( 'wp_title', 'twentytwelve_wp_title', 10, 2 );

Also, you need to clear your browser cache to see results.

Twenty Twelve Theme

I recently changed themes from a custom made one, that I’ve used for a long time, to a theme called Twenty Twelve, the current WordPress default theme. I made one slight change though which alters the entire look of the theme. I changed font from the default ‘Open Sans’ to ‘Lato’ which is available from Google. To facilitate the change, I’m using my Webfonts plugin and this CSS code:

#page {font-family:'Lato', sans-serif;}

WordPress 3.5 Media Manager

I recently upgraded to WordPress 3.5. One thing about WordPress updates, they are super easy. One of the best features of WordPress 3.5 is the new Media Manager. Uploading images is a breeze. Just drag and drop a file, or manually choose file and click. Viewing previous uploaded images in the Media Library is a total experience now. Thumbnails of recent uploads are displayed in rows and columns, and they are scrollable. Selecting an image and inserting it to a post is way too easy. Kudos to the development team for a fantastic job with this upgrade, and especially with the work on the new Media Manager.

Tricky WordPress Multisite Setup

I was converting a regular WordPress blog to a Multisite blog the other day. I got stuck in the part where I needed to edit the wp-config.php file. I applied the changes to wp-config.php as suggested in the installation instructions. The problem was I wasn’t seeing the Multisite menus you would normally find under ‘My Sites’ inside the WordPress Dashboard. The installation instructions tells you to add the following lines to your wp-config.php file.

/** Enable WordPress Multisite */
define('WP_ALLOW_MULTISITE', true);
define('MULTISITE', true);
define('SUBDOMAIN_INSTALL', false);
$base = '/';
define('DOMAIN_CURRENT_SITE', 'domain.com');
define('PATH_CURRENT_SITE', '/');
define('SITE_ID_CURRENT_SITE', 1);
define('BLOG_ID_CURRENT_SITE', 1);

It was a silly mistake on my part. I placed these entries at the end of the wp-config file. It is important that these lines remain above the absolute path statement and before the wp-settings are loaded. See below.

/* That's all, stop editing! Happy blogging. */
 
/** Absolute path to the WordPress directory. */
if ( !defined('ABSPATH') ) define('ABSPATH', dirname(__FILE__) . '/');
 
/** Sets up WordPress vars and included files. */
require_once(ABSPATH . 'wp-settings.php');

Keep these lines at the end of the wp-config.php file.

WP-Admin Trailing Slash Problem

I had this WordPress wp-admin trailing slash problem for a couple of weeks now. When I don’t include a trailing slash after the wp-admin directory when logging in to WordPress, I will get a 404 missing page error. It’s a little annoying if you ask me, but it doesn’t really affect blog readers. It only shows up if you want to login to the WordPress Dashboard, and you forget to type the trailing slash at the end of wp-admin. Example below.

site.com/wp-admin/ <– this redirects to the WordPress login ok.
site.com/wp-admin <– this will result in a 404 missing page error.

So, I tried a couple of suggestions I found online, but the suggested changes to the .htaccess file didn’t seem to fix the issue. A couple of occasions, the suggestions were exactly the same code I already had in my .htaccess file. So, I tried a couple more suggestions. I noticed one blog post had a couple more lines in the .htaccess file that I haven’t seen in mine. So, I tried it and it worked. So, here are the changes I made.

I added these two lines to my .htaccess.

RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /

I think the key code is in the second line. It basically establishes the base URL.