Dell Streak

Introducing the Dell Streak. It’s a 5 inch go-anywhere entertainment, social connection and navigation device. For $549 and a 2 year contract with AT&T you can have a Streak which browse the web, watch videos, access social media Facebook, Twitter and more, Google Maps with navigation, and hundreds of other applications from the Android Marketplace. Oh yes, it’s an Android powered device. It’s too bad, just like the iPhone, it’s only available from AT&T. Will you get one?

Xperia X10

It looks like AT&T and Sony Ericsson are collaborating on a new Android superphone called the Xperia X10. It features a 4-inch screen, a 1GHz processor, an 8.1 megapixel camera and up to 32GB of memory. There is no word yet whether the device will run on Android 2.1 or the coveted Android 2.2.

The device also comes with Timescape which allows it to make chronological updates to Facebook, Twitter, SMS and other services. The device retails for $149 with a 2 year agreement with data plan. It will be available August 15.

Finally, here’s a preview of the Xperia X10.

Remove Old Kernel in Ubuntu and Grub2

In 2005, I wrote a short article on how to delete old kernels in Linux. At that time, I was using Fedora exclusively. Since then, I’ve moved on to Ubuntu. In addition, Grub2 is now standard for all Ubuntu releases. This short article will show you how to remove old kernels in your Linux system as well as clean up your Grub2 entries. By the way, you will see Grub2 entries only if you have a multi-boot configuration. If not, Ubuntu will boot directly to the login screen.

First, determine the current kernel being used by typing the following command in the Terminal.

# uname -r

The result will display something like the one below.

2.6.32-24-generic

Now, it’s important not to delete your current kernel because all hell will break loose or the sky will fall on your head. In either case, you don’t want to be in that predicament.

You can use the ‘Synaptic Package Manager’ to remove the older kernels. Use ‘2.6.32’ to narrow down your search. Right click on the kernel you want removed and choose ‘Mark for Complete Removal.’ After all older kernels are removed, you can now update the Grub2 configuration.

Grub2 Configuration

# sudo update-grub

That’s it. The next time you boot your multi-boot Ubuntu system, you will see less entries in Grub as well as successfully have deleted older kernels you no longer needed. There is a more detailed instruction how to remove other entries in Grub from howtogeek.com.

Mandriva Spring 2010

I was a Mandrake user for several years, before Ubuntu and Fedora were even part of the Linux lexicon. At the time, Mandrake was one of the easiest distributions in the Linux community. Mandrake was derived from Redhat with a focus on ease of use and usability.

Shortly after, Mandrake became Mandriva. I lost track of the distro because other better distros came along. Fedora and Ubuntu particularly took the Linux community by storm. Most people jumped ship and moved on to other distros. I did the same and chose Ubuntu.

Mandriva is still around. 3 million users strong according to their website. Mandriva has a new distro called Mandriva Spring 2010. It’s available for free to download. It comes in two flavors, Gnome and KDE. I’m not used to seeing Mandriva with Gnome since it was a KDE distro.

If you have some spare time, you can give Mandriva Spring 2010 a try. I’m interested in two other products by Mandriva, the InstantOn and Flash. InstantOn boots in less than 10 seconds while Flash is a mobile desktop in a USB key. Unfortunately, they are not free.

Anyways, give Mandriva Spring 2010 a try. Download.

Speed Up Ubuntu 10.04

Are you looking for ways to speed up the boot time of your Ubuntu 10.04 installation. Linux Tips offers one way of cutting down your wait time by creating a profile in Grub. By creating a profile, your boot information is stored for future use. You’ll see remarkable improvements after a couple of boots. Detail instructions are included in the article. To see the rest of details, just read the original article from Linux Tips.