Adobe Flash in Linux is Slow

Adobe Flash in Ubuntu Linux is slow as molasses. I’ve noticed it while playing Bejeweled Blitz in Facebook. I’ve tried installing different plugins like Shockwave, Gnash, Adobe Flash and Adobe Flash 10, but none made Flash any faster. The Flash games lagged so bad that they were practically impossible to play.

While googling tonight, I came across a website suggesting that I install a Flash plugin called Flashblock-Addon. This add-on plugin disables all Flash programs in a page from loading automatically. The programs can be played manually by clicking on the play button.

The reason this plugin works is because the Adobe Flash plugin for Linux is not tuned properly. This is not a Linux issue, but an Adobe one. The problem is particularly telling if a page has multiple instances of Flash programs running.

The plugin merely disables all flash programs from running automatically. The user can pick and choose which one they want to run limiting the number of Flash instances running in the background.

It’s not really a fix, but more of a workaround.

To install the Flashblock-Addon, you can download it from here.

Firefox 4 Beta for Android Phones

Mozilla just released Firefox 4 Beta for Android phones. This is awesome news for Firefox admirers. Firefox 4 will be available for download on any Android 2.0 or newer based smart phone and the Nokia N900. From Yahoo/PC World:

The beta versions include a feature called Sync, which synchronizes a user’s tabs, history, bookmarks and passwords between the Firefox browser on a desktop PC and that on the smartphone. The browser also comes with what Mozilla calls the Awesome Screen, which gives the user access to recent browsing history, bookmarks and tabs by tapping on the browser’s address bar. The start screen shows tabs from the last time the user accessed the Internet, tabs from the PC and suggests add-ons to the browser to personalize it.

Firefox for mobile is available for the Nokia N900, or for phones running Android 2.0 or newer. It has been tested on the Nexus One, HTC’s Desire and EVO 4G, and Motorola’s Droid 2. The browser should work on other Android-based smartphones from Motorola and HTC, as well, including the Desire Z (T-Mobile G2), Droid Incredible, Droid X and the Milestone (Verizon Droid), but hasn’t been tested on these devices. The Samsung Galaxy S, and its various different U.S. versions, is also included in the latter group, according to a list of compatible phones on Mozilla’s Website.

To improve speed and responsiveness, the browser runs the user interface in a separate process from the one rendering Web content. The split allows Firefox to react faster to user input while pages are loading, according to Mozilla.

49 Microsoft Vulnerabilities

Microsoft plans to patch 49 vulnerabilities this coming Tuesday. Microsoft considers four of them to be critical. The patch covers fixes to Internet Explorer, MS Office, .NET, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008. To date, this will be Microsoft biggest patch at one time.

Speaking of Microsoft, I’ve yet to take advantage of the latest Windows 7 Home Edition Family Pack for just $149. The latest release started October 2.  The family pack comes with 3 licenses. Share between two other friends and you can get a Windows 7 Home Edition for about $50. Good deal.

Ubuntu 10.10 on 10.10.10

Ubuntu 10.10 is scheduled for release on 10.10.10. How clever. It looks more like an internal IP address. Well, sort of. The latest distro is also known as Maverick Meerkat. So, what’s new with Meerkat? Here’s a sneak preview of features from Ubuntu.

The GNOME base platform has been updated to the current 2.31 versions. This particularly includes the new dconf and gsettings API.

Evolution was updated to the 2.30 version, which operates much faster compared to the version in Ubuntu 10.04 LTS.

Shotwell has replaced F-Spot as the default photo manager.

Gwibber has been updated to support the recent change in Twitter’s authentication system, as well as changing the back end storage to improve performance.

The Sound Indicator has been enhanced to include music player controls.

The Ubuntu Software Center has an updated look and feel, including the new “Featured” and “What’s New” views for showcasing applications, an improved package description view, and a “For Purchase” software category has been added. You can also now easily access your package installation history too.

Ubuntu One: Polished desktop integration with new sign up and sign in process. Tighter integration with Ubuntu SSO. Nautilus enhancements for managing folder sync preferences. Faster file sync speed. Share links to music within the Ubuntu One Music Store.