What is Snappy Ubuntu?

Canonical released Snappy Ubuntu a month ago. From Ubuntu Insights:

Today we’re announcing “snappy” Ubuntu Core, a new rendition of Ubuntu for the cloud with transactional updates. Ubuntu Core is a minimal server image with the same libraries as today’s Ubuntu, but applications are provided through a simpler mechanism. The snappy approach is faster, more reliable, and lets us provide stronger security guarantees for apps and users – that’s why we call them “snappy” applications.

Snappy apps and Ubuntu Core itself can be upgraded atomically and rolled back if needed – a bulletproof approach to systems management that is perfect for container deployments. It’s called “transactional” or “image-based” systems management, and we’re delighted to make it available on every Ubuntu certified cloud.

Shortly after, Canonical mentioned Snappy Ubuntu is now available on Amazon Web Services (AWS).

Canonical is delighted to announce the availability of snappy Ubuntu Core on Amazon Web Services (AWS).  Snappy Ubuntu Core is a new ultra fast Ubuntu that is designed for extremely fast deployment on Amazon EC2.

Ubuntu Core is the new “snappy” rendition of the popular cloud OS, with a very lean and secure base image that features transactional updates for both system and applications. Snappy Ubuntu is perfect for container-oriented deployments using technologies like Docker.

Customers can try a beta version of snappy Ubuntu Core today on Amazon EC2 by launching an instance of Ubuntu Core. Here are the instructions.

I can’t wait to try this with Docker.

Ubuntu Edge-Like Tablet

There’s an upstart called MJ Technology that plans to release an Ubuntu Edge-like Tablet in 2015. It will run based on Ubuntu Touch which has been finalized this fall. Initial tablets will come in two sizes: 8.9 and 10.1 inches. The initial hardware will run on

  • 2.4 GHz Intel Quad Core
  • 4 GB DDR3 RAM
  • 64 GB Internal Storage
  • MicroSD slot for external storage
  • Two USB 2.0 ports and one micro-USB port
  • 8.9″ and 10.1″ HD IPS display with 5 point multi-touch
  • 5 GHz Wi-Fi
  • Bluetooth 4.0

Read the article from Tom’s Hardware.

Chromebooks Can Now Run Linux in Its Own Window

Chromebook’s can now run Linux on its own window, based on this article at lifehacker.com.

Chrome: You’ve been able to install and run Linux on Chromebooks for a while, but a new Chrome extension allows you to run it inside a window, without switching back and forth.

The extension, Crouton Integration, still requires you to enable developer mode and install Crouton, but allows you to run Linux right in a window instead of as a full desktop. If you’ve already installed Crouton, the process to run Linux in a window is easy and detailed over on Googler François Beaufort’s Google+ profile. If you haven’t installed Linux yet, our guide will get you started.

Netflix Comes to Linux

I should start writing about things I missed this year. Apparently, this is one of them. Finally. Netflix is now available in Linux, albeit it’s limited to one browser. For now. It only works on the latest version of Chrome, that’s Chrome 37 or later. It won’t work in Firefox because it currently does not support encrypted media extensions.

What’s made it all possible? Netflix streams in HTML5, but uses the Encrypted Media Extensions for Digital Rights Management (DRM) to prevent piracy. Recently, Ubuntu started to include Network Security Services (NSS) in its normal updates that allow browsers to access EME.

Once it was available, Netflix delivered and the rest is history.

SystemBack

If you want to create a backup of your Ubuntu desktop and create a ISO based on your setup, then SystemBack is the program that you need. SystemBack performs a backup of your system and creates a live ISO that you can boot up and install over multiple computers. SystemBack is available via PPA. To install, just type the following in the Terminal.

// Add repository for SystemBack
sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:nemh/systemback
 
// Run an update
sudo apt-get update
 
// Install SystemBack
sudo apt-get install systemback

Once installed, run SystemBack from the Menu.