Debian 8.1 Released

Per the Debian website:

The Debian project is pleased to announce the first update of its stable distribution Debian 8 (codename jessie). This update mainly adds corrections for security problems to the stable release, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories were already published separately and are referenced where available.

Please note that this update does not constitute a new version of Debian 8 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old jessie CDs or DVDs but only to update via an up-to-date Debian mirror after an installation, to cause any out of date packages to be updated.

Those who frequently install updates from security.debian.org won’t have to update many packages and most updates from security.debian.org are included in this update.

New installation media and CD and DVD images containing updated packages will be available soon at the regular locations.

Upgrading to this revision online is usually done by pointing the aptitude (or apt) package tool (see the sources.list(5) manual page) to one of Debian’s many FTP or HTTP mirrors. A comprehensive list of mirrors is available at:

https://www.debian.org/mirror/list

RIP Mandriva Linux

Mandriva Linux is deader that dead. How could that be? Well, for one, the distro hasn’t been updated since 2011. Most of the developers were laid off as early as 2010. Whatever is left of the company called Mandriva, is liquidating pretty much all its assets. Mandrake, the predecessor of Mandriva, used to be my favorite Linux distro. You can view my post about Mandrake here back in 2004. There’s another post here. Mandriva had quite a market share back in its day. Then came Ubuntu. Ubuntu pretty much took the wind out of Mandriva’s sail. So, here we are now. There are a couple of forks. Mageia and OpenMandriva are chugging along.

Best Linux Distros Available

Several weeks ago, I wrote on this blog about the Linux distros that people should try. I wasn’t far off on my assessment when I read this article by Digital Trends. As you can see, I stuck with the tried-and-true distros that are popular, as well as distros which represented the major Linux branches, and distros which people generally consider as very solid. As you can see, you can’t go wrong with Debian, Fedora, Centos, and Ubuntu. You throw in Mint, one the most popular distros nowadays, and you have a very good list.