Virtualization Options

If you’re thinking of creating a virtual machine on the OS of choice, there are quite a few options to consider. In addition to having a powerful computer with lots of memory to be able to run multiple hosted operating systems, there are several virtualization software to consider. Which one is for you depends on your budget, your expertise and preference. Some virtualization software are free to use, others you have to purchase. Here are your options:

  • VMWare’s vSphere
  • Redhat’s KVM
  • Microsoft’s Hyper-V
  • Citrix’s XenServer
  • Oracle’s Virtualbox

VMWare is the 800 pound gorilla. It dominates the virtualization market at 56%, but it has been eroding over the years. There’s stiff competition from Hyper-V, XenServer and KVM. My personal favorite however, is Virtualbox. It runs on multiple platforms, Windows, Mac and Linux. It’s relatively simple to use. Others may find Virtualbox a bit slower and some find it technically challenging, but to each his own. As they say, your mileage may vary. It really depends on your preference.

Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela

Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela was released June 30, 2015. It comes with Mate 1.10.

Linux Mint 17.2 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2019. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

Nova OS

Meet Nova OS, Cuba’s Linux-kernel based operating system, built by students of University of Computer Sciences.

The operating system is called Nova OS and the latest available version is 4.0, released March 22, 2013, which is based on Canonical’s Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) and built around the GNOME 3.4 desktop environment.

Yes, that means Nova OS does not use Ubuntu’s Unity user interface, providing users with a traditional layout comprising two panels, using GNOME’s GNOME-Shell interface, but with a custom design.

At the moment, Nova OS 4.0 is distributed in three editions, Escritorio, Ligero, and Servidor. The Escritorio edition is the main one, also known as the Desktop CD, which provides users with a complete GNOME-based desktop environment.

Debian 8.1 Released

Per the Debian website:

The Debian project is pleased to announce the first update of its stable distribution Debian 8 (codename jessie). This update mainly adds corrections for security problems to the stable release, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories were already published separately and are referenced where available.

Please note that this update does not constitute a new version of Debian 8 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old jessie CDs or DVDs but only to update via an up-to-date Debian mirror after an installation, to cause any out of date packages to be updated.

Those who frequently install updates from won’t have to update many packages and most updates from are included in this update.

New installation media and CD and DVD images containing updated packages will be available soon at the regular locations.

Upgrading to this revision online is usually done by pointing the aptitude (or apt) package tool (see the sources.list(5) manual page) to one of Debian’s many FTP or HTTP mirrors. A comprehensive list of mirrors is available at:

RIP Mandriva Linux

Mandriva Linux is deader that dead. How could that be? Well, for one, the distro hasn’t been updated since 2011. Most of the developers were laid off as early as 2010. Whatever is left of the company called Mandriva, is liquidating pretty much all its assets. Mandrake, the predecessor of Mandriva, used to be my favorite Linux distro. You can view my post about Mandrake here back in 2004. There’s another post here. Mandriva had quite a market share back in its day. Then came Ubuntu. Ubuntu pretty much took the wind out of Mandriva’s sail. So, here we are now. There are a couple of forks. Mageia and OpenMandriva are chugging along.