Zero Day Flaw

Millions of Linux servers and Android devices were hit with a zero-day flaw today.

What is zero-day flaw? From pctools.com:

A zero day vulnerability refers to a hole in software that is unknown to the vendor. This security hole is then exploited by hackers before the vendor becomes aware and hurries to fix it—this exploit is called a zero day attack. Uses of zero day attacks can include infiltrating malware, spyware or allowing unwanted access to user information. The term “zero day” refers to the unknown nature of the hole to those outside of the hackers, specifically, the developers. Once the vulnerability becomes known, a race begins for the developer, who must protect users.

From zdnet.com. The issue today was:

A new, previously undiscovered flaw that allows an attacker to escalate local user privileges to the highest “root” level is said to hit “tens of millions” of Linux PCs and servers. Because some of the code is shared, the zero-day flaw also affects more than two-thirds of all Android devices. The flaw, said to date back to 2012, affects Linux kernel versions 3.8 and higher, which extends to devices running Android KitKat 4.4 and higher. The vulnerability is in the keyring facility, baked into the core of the Linux software. If exploited, an attacker would be able to execute code on the Linux kernel, and extract cached security data, which can include in some cases encryption and authentication keys.

Read the rest of the article from ZDNet.

VLC on ChromeOS

VLC is considered by many as the swiss army knife of video players is finally coming to ChromeOS users. As you may well know, you can pretty much run VLC on any platform, from the PC, to Mac and Linux and to practically every mobile device. The last frontier was ChromeOS. The VideoLan team just made the popular player available now to ChromeOS users.

Ubuntu Mate on Raspberry Pi 2

When the original Raspberry Pi came out, it could only run Raspbian on it. Raspbian is a free operating system based on Debian optimized for the Raspberry Pi hardware. Then the Raspberry 2 came out, a bit more powerful with a quad-core Broadcom BCM2836 ARM v7 processor at 900MHz. Now, you can run Ubuntu Mate on it. Ubuntu has a project dedicated for Raspberry Pi 2. It’s still not powerful to run Ubuntu Unity desktop, but Ubuntu Mate works quite well on the Raspberry Pi 2.

Raspberry Pi Model Zero

Last week, founder Eben Upton of the Pi Foundation announced the Raspberry Pi Model Zero. The tiny computer device which runs on Raspbian, a free and open-source OS based on Debian, will sell for $5.00. You can purchase it from Adafruit and other outlets.

Here are some specs:

  • Processor: 1GHz Broadcomm BCM2835
  • Memory: 512MB of RAM
  • Storage: a user-supplied microSD
  • GPIO: 26/40 unpopulated through-holes
  • USB ports: USB On-the-Go…Micro USB
  • Video Output: Composite video is available from 2 unpopulated pins.
  • HDMI video is available from a mini HDMI port.

Best Steam Machines

Are you looking for the best Steam machine?

Here’s a first batch of steam machine comparisons from FutureMark.

A Steam Machine is a PC for your living room. Play your games on your big screen TV while sitting comfortably on your sofa. Steam Machines run a Linux-based operating system called SteamOS and are controlled with a gamepad instead of a mouse and keyboard.

Redhat Now Available on Azure

Microsoft and Redhat announced today that Redhat is now available on Azure Cloud Services. Previously only Ubuntu, CentOS, Oracle Linux, SUSE Linux Enterprise and openSUSE were the Linux OS options. In addition, JBoss middleware will also be available in the coming weeks. Here’s the announcement from Scott Guthrie, Executive Vice President of Cloud and Enterprise.

Ubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf

Ubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf is finally here. What’s new? Well, there are new enhancements, but they are underwhelming. The latest release has new scrollbars. Ubuntu 15.10 is laying the groundwork for the next version 16.04. The changes are pretty much ho-hum. Like the author of this article said, if you like to see noticeable changes, look at Linux Mint.