Debian Turns 23

Debian is 23 years old. From Debian’s site:

Today is Debian’s 23rd anniversary. If you are close to any of the cities celebrating Debian Day 2016, you’re very welcome to join the party! If not, there’s still time for you to organize a little celebration or contribution to Debian. For example, you can have a look at the Debian timeline and learn about the history of the project. If you notice that some piece of information is still missing, feel free to add it to the timeline. Or you can scratch your creative itch and suggest a wallpaper to be part of the artwork for the next release. Our favorite operating system is the result of all the work we have done together. Thanks to everybody who has contributed in these 23 years, and happy birthday Debian!

Fuchsia

Google is working on a new operating system called Fuchsia. From the Verge:

Google appears to have started work on a completely new operating system, but no one knows quite what it’s for. The project’s name is Fuchsia, and it currently exists as a growing pile of code on the search giant’s code depository and on GitHub, too. The fledgling OS has a number of interesting features, but so far Google has yet to comment on its intended function. All we really know is that this looks like a fresh start for Google, as the operating system does not use the Linux kernel — a core of basic code that underpins both Android and Chrome OS.

PXE Server

How to install a PXE server courtesy of OSTechnix:

If you’re a System administrator, you happen to install many operating systems very often on your lab or workplace. Sometimes, you might fed up with installing OS on multiple systems everyday. Wouldn’t be better if you could install OS on multiple systems at a time? This is where PXE server comes in handy. PXE, abbreviation of preboot execution environment, allows us to deploy operating systems on multiple systems automatically at a time in the network. Also PXE server helps you to install an OS in a remote system that doesn’t have any options for CD/DVD or USB drives.

Linux is 25

Linux is 25 years old in 2016, but no one really knows when it really started. From CW.

We could consider Linux’s 25th birthday to be August 25th. That’s because on that date in 1991, Linus Torvalds made his announcement to the minix community to let them know that he was working on a modest new OS. He had started the work in April. By October 5th, he felt that his new OS was usable and ready for the community at large.

Whether you count the announcement (8/25/1991), its readiness for use/testing (10/05/1991), or Linus’ initially getting his project off the ground (April 1991) as the official birthday, Linux turns 25 sometime this year. And what is most amazing is what has happened since. All manner of Linux OSes have come into being.

Is it August 25th, 1991 or was it sometime in April 1991?

Linux Distros Dropping 32 Bit Support

Ubuntu plans to drop 32-bit support in 2018 with the release of Ubuntu 18.10. Fedora has stopped using 32-bit on its server offering as of Fedora 24. They still support 32-bit for the desktop. I imagine other Linux major distribution will follow suit as older hardware eventually are phased out.

Git 2.9

Git 2.9 is now available, which ends the development of Git 2.9 development branch. Some of the new features include the implementation of git-multimail for sending notification emails for pushes to a Git repository, a brand new “interactive.diffFilter” configuration which gives developers the ability to customize the diff displayed in “git add -i” sessions.

The following core commands have received improvements as part of the Git 2.9 release:

  • git p4
  • git tag
  • git merge
  • git pull
  • git apply -v
  • git worktree add
  • git mergetools
  • git pull –rebase
  • git send-email
  • git rerere
  • git clone
  • git commit