Linux is 25

Linux is 25 years old in 2016, but no one really knows when it really started. From CW.

We could consider Linux’s 25th birthday to be August 25th. That’s because on that date in 1991, Linus Torvalds made his announcement to the minix community to let them know that he was working on a modest new OS. He had started the work in April. By October 5th, he felt that his new OS was usable and ready for the community at large.

Whether you count the announcement (8/25/1991), its readiness for use/testing (10/05/1991), or Linus’ initially getting his project off the ground (April 1991) as the official birthday, Linux turns 25 sometime this year. And what is most amazing is what has happened since. All manner of Linux OSes have come into being.

Is it August 25th, 1991 or was it sometime in April 1991?

Linux Distros Dropping 32 Bit Support

Ubuntu plans to drop 32-bit support in 2018 with the release of Ubuntu 18.10. Fedora has stopped using 32-bit on its server offering as of Fedora 24. They still support 32-bit for the desktop. I imagine other Linux major distribution will follow suit as older hardware eventually are phased out.

Git 2.9

Git 2.9 is now available, which ends the development of Git 2.9 development branch. Some of the new features include the implementation of git-multimail for sending notification emails for pushes to a Git repository, a brand new “interactive.diffFilter” configuration which gives developers the ability to customize the diff displayed in “git add -i” sessions.

The following core commands have received improvements as part of the Git 2.9 release:

  • git p4
  • git tag
  • git merge
  • git pull
  • git apply -v
  • git worktree add
  • git mergetools
  • git pull –rebase
  • git send-email
  • git rerere
  • git clone
  • git commit

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Xenial Xerus Is Now Available

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is now available. From Canonical:

Canonical announced today it will release Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on 21st April, featuring the new ‘snap’ package format and LXD pure-container hypervisor. This is the latest version of the world’s most widely used Linux platform across desktop, IoT and cloud computing.

An Ubuntu Long Term Support (LTS) release is supported and maintained by Canonical for five years, making it the most stable, reliable, secure and cost-effective Linux platform for long-term, large-scale deployments. This is the 6th such LTS release for Ubuntu, and marks the first time that the platform is supported on mainframes, the world’s largest and most powerful Linux systems.

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