What is Snappy Ubuntu?

Canonical released Snappy Ubuntu a month ago. From Ubuntu Insights:

Today we’re announcing “snappy” Ubuntu Core, a new rendition of Ubuntu for the cloud with transactional updates. Ubuntu Core is a minimal server image with the same libraries as today’s Ubuntu, but applications are provided through a simpler mechanism. The snappy approach is faster, more reliable, and lets us provide stronger security guarantees for apps and users – that’s why we call them “snappy” applications.

Snappy apps and Ubuntu Core itself can be upgraded atomically and rolled back if needed – a bulletproof approach to systems management that is perfect for container deployments. It’s called “transactional” or “image-based” systems management, and we’re delighted to make it available on every Ubuntu certified cloud.

Shortly after, Canonical mentioned Snappy Ubuntu is now available on Amazon Web Services (AWS).

Canonical is delighted to announce the availability of snappy Ubuntu Core on Amazon Web Services (AWS).  Snappy Ubuntu Core is a new ultra fast Ubuntu that is designed for extremely fast deployment on Amazon EC2.

Ubuntu Core is the new “snappy” rendition of the popular cloud OS, with a very lean and secure base image that features transactional updates for both system and applications. Snappy Ubuntu is perfect for container-oriented deployments using technologies like Docker.

Customers can try a beta version of snappy Ubuntu Core today on Amazon EC2 by launching an instance of Ubuntu Core. Here are the instructions.

I can’t wait to try this with Docker.

Requested an Invite to Google Inbox

I just sent an email to inbox@google.com for an invitation to newly minted Google Inbox. I really would like to write a review of it. We’ll see how soon will I get it. I heard it’s hard to get by. Google is touting Inbox as a trend that will change email forever. It’s a way of organizing and prioritizing with important and relevant email. I would love to get my hands on it.

My Next Phone Is?

My phone contract is coming up this month. It’s time to think about the next phone. There are many choices to consider. There is Apple’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus along with its Apple Pay. Then there’s the new Google’s Nexus 6 and the slightly older Nexus 5 model from last year. One thing I am seriously considering is lowering my monthly payments to affordable levels. I’m targeting perhaps around $50 for monthly payments. The only way I can achieve this is to purchase an unlocked phone to go along with T-Mobile’s prepaid plans. So, the iPhone 6 is definitely out of the question. The Nexus 6 is very tempting, but the price tag of $650 is both disappointing and discouraging. So, that leaves me with last year’s Nexus 5. An unlocked Nexus sells for $399. This might be my next phone. I’m still looking around for other options. If you have any suggestions, please let me know.

Google Reinvents the Inbox

Email has been around for a long time. It predates the Internet. Google is tweaking how email is displayed to users by adding features which makes it easier to get to the important data. Several months ago, Google added tabs to differentiate social updates and promotions from regular email. With Inbox, Google is adding Bundles, a feature that will group together similar messages, like bank statements and receipts for example. Another feature is called Highlights, which places important emails to the front and center. Inbox also has Reminders, Assists and Snooze. Reminders are pretty much self explanatory. Assists work with reminders to bring out relevant information. Snooze dismisses information in the background. Google Inbox is not available yet to all. You can ask for an invite by sending an email to inbox@gmail.com.