Resetting your keychain in Mac OS X

I had a couple of weird issues on my MacBoook Air for several weeks now. Every time I tried to use iTunes, it keeps spitting out an error saying, “iTunes can’t verify the identity of the server.” In addition to iTunes, I also had an issue with the App Store. I can’t login, and it’s displaying a blank page. I tried going to an Apple Store, but the wait is 7 hours, so I called Apple Support. Since my laptop is 4 years old, Apple wants me to purchase one-time support fee of $29. I said no thanks. After a couple of hours of googling and troubleshooting, I finally found a fix. All I needed to do was reset my keychain. If you have the issue I had with iTunes and the App Store, try resetting your keychain. I’m glad I didn’t cough up $29 for a simple fix.

Thunderbolt 3 vs USB-C

This is a good read regarding the differences between Thunderbolt 3 and USB-C.

Thunderbolt 3 is backward compatible with USB-C.

All USB-C devices can be plugged into, and will work in, a Thunderbolt 3 port, but it will transfer data at the slower USB-C speed. An easy thing to remember is that Thunderbolt 3 ports are technically backward-compatible with USB-C devices.

Thunderbolt 3, however, is not (necessarily) USB-C compatible. While it’s true that you can physically plug a Thunderbolt 3 device into a USB-C port, it isn’t guaranteed to work. Some Thunderbolt 3 devices, like power adapters, may charge your USB-C-only laptop, but devices that transfer data probably will not. You’ll likely get a message on your laptop screen that the Thunderbolt 3 device is incompatible with the USB-C port.

 

 

iWatch 76% Markup

If you ever wonder how AAPL, Apple’s ticker symbol on Nasdaq, has done in the last 5 years. It started out at around $40 per share five years ago. It’s currently priced at about $130. That’s 3 times the value. Part of the reason why Apple has so much revenue, they place a huge markup on their products. Consider the latest and greatest, the iWatch. According to Geek.com article, the iWatch costs only $83.70 to manufacture. As the article mentions, it does not put into account the cost of development, support, packaging, etc. If you put that aside for a moment, the cheapest iWatch you can buy from Apple retails for $349, a 76% markup. That’s the just cost of using Apple products. In spite of the cost, consumers still buy Apple products for quality and support. I think consumers value that. That’s the reason why people still flock to buy Apple products. But 76% is a crazy value.

Two Month Wait For iWatch

I read there’s a two month wait for the iWatch. That’s a long time to wait for an order. I’m not sure if Apple purposely designed this to create demand or maybe there are manufacturing issues indeed. Probably the latter. Nevertheless, it’s a long time to wait.