Is The iPad Pro a PC Killer?

Is the iPad Pro a PC killer? Not so fast. Initial tests indicate that the iPad Pro is fast, but not as fast as a laptop. And this whole notion that the iPad will replace the PC is ludicrous. It won’t. Businesses and individuals won’t jump out all of a sudden and abandon their desktops for the iPad Pro. I guarantee it, people will still use the desktop for certain tasks. We welcome the vast improvement that Apple has given the iPad, but in the end, it’s still a tablet, for now. And tablets do what tablets do. There are not desktops. Not yet, anyway. Although, the distinction between the two will most likely blur in the future. Most people’s workflow does not translate on the iPad at the moment. Try to work on the iPad for an entire week without ever touching your desktop, and you get the idea. It’s not quite there yet. And I’m not sure if it’s even going to be there in the future. It’s like trying to mold a small car into becoming a pickup. There are certain things tablets do very well. There are certain tasks that desktops do very as well. I don’t think that moment is now.

Apple TV Now Available For Order

Starting today, you can start ordering your Apple TV. It will start shipping October 30. The 32 GB version costs $149 while the 64 GB version is $199. The new Apple TV will ship with a new remote with a mini touchpad. In addition, Apple TV also comes with a new interface and Siri the voice-enabled application that allows you to control the Apple TV using your own voice. To order, visit Apple’s website.

OS X El Capitan

Just read at IW that the new Apple OS El Capitan has locked out users from gaining access to root.

If you haven’t heard, Apple has locked out root from various file system paths and core functions in Mac OS X 10.11 El Capitan. The new sheriff here is System Integrity Protection (SIP), which reduces root privileges in an attempt to increase security.

The gist is that no user — not even root — can write to /usr, /bin, /System, and /sbin or debug protected processes. Apple has also removed the ability to use unsigned kernel extensions through boot-time flags. It’s important to note that SIP can be disabled, through the recovery partition, but this will typically be done only for development and testing purposes.

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