Zero Day Flaw

Millions of Linux servers and Android devices were hit with a zero-day flaw today.

What is zero-day flaw? From

A zero day vulnerability refers to a hole in software that is unknown to the vendor. This security hole is then exploited by hackers before the vendor becomes aware and hurries to fix it—this exploit is called a zero day attack. Uses of zero day attacks can include infiltrating malware, spyware or allowing unwanted access to user information. The term “zero day” refers to the unknown nature of the hole to those outside of the hackers, specifically, the developers. Once the vulnerability becomes known, a race begins for the developer, who must protect users.

From The issue today was:

A new, previously undiscovered flaw that allows an attacker to escalate local user privileges to the highest “root” level is said to hit “tens of millions” of Linux PCs and servers. Because some of the code is shared, the zero-day flaw also affects more than two-thirds of all Android devices. The flaw, said to date back to 2012, affects Linux kernel versions 3.8 and higher, which extends to devices running Android KitKat 4.4 and higher. The vulnerability is in the keyring facility, baked into the core of the Linux software. If exploited, an attacker would be able to execute code on the Linux kernel, and extract cached security data, which can include in some cases encryption and authentication keys.

Read the rest of the article from ZDNet.