Give Fluxbox A Try

Are you getting tired of running Unity, Gnome or KDE on your Ubuntu desktop? Try Fluxbox, a windows manager that is light on resources. Fluxbox is based on Blackbox. It’s extremely easy to use. If you are looking for an alternative to Unity, Gnome or KDE, then you should give Fluxbox a try.

How To Install Fluxbox

To install Fluxbox, you can access the Ubuntu Software Center and search for Fluxbox, and then Click Install. If you prefer the Terminal, you simply type the following command:

sudo apt-get install fluxbox

Start Fluxbox

To start Fluxbox, you will need to log out of your current windows manager. There is no need to reboot your computer. You will be taken to the Ubuntu Login screen instead. You can choose Fluxbox instead of your default windows manager. Mine was originally set to Gnome.

Right Click

Once inside Fluxbox, you can access everything using the left click of your mouse. Fluxbox has a simple menu that is accessible anywhere on the screen. Just right click and select any application that you want.

Adding to the Menu

Not everything is on the menu. You may have to add a few things. It’s easy. The file is located in ~/.fluxbox/menu. You may want to edit it and add your own entries.

vi ~/.fluxbox/menu

It uses the following format:

[exec] (Gimp) {/usr/bin/gimp}

Change Background Image

You can change background by typing this command on the Terminal:

fbsetbg -f path/to/file/image.jpg

In addition, you can also change themes. Just right click and select Styles. Choose one from about 25 different themes. I happen to like bora_black.

Give Fluxbox a try. If you don’t like it, you can always go back to your default windows manager. If you like it, you might want to stick around for a while. Enjoy the fast response of Fluxbox.

Firefox 10.0.1 Update Fixes Critical Bug

If you set Firefox for automatic updates, one way you can tell if Firefox has been updated is, it always require that you restart your browser. Firefox 10 was updated over the weekend to version 10.0.1 to fix a critical bug that can potentially be exploited by attackers. The bug also affects Firefox ESR (Extended Support Release), Thunderbird and SeaMonkey.

The security hole is within nsXBLDocumentInfo::ReadPrototypeBindings.

Mozilla developers Andrew McCreight and Olli Pettay found that ReadPrototypeBindings will leave a XBL binding in a hash table even when the function fails. If this occurs, when the cycle collector reads this hash table and attempts to do a virtual method on this binding a crash will occur. This crash may be potentially exploitable.

You can force Firefox to update or just wait until you’re prompted. Since it’s critical, it’s probably a good idea to force an update. You can usually find it on About > Apply Upgrade.

In addition, there’s an interesting article speaking of Firefox’s impending demise. Personally, I wouldn’t call Firefox dead. It’s just that Chrome and others are making it the browser war very competitive. It’s a good thing. A little competition between browsers is good for everyone.

Porting From Vonage To Google Voice

If you want to port your phone number from Vonage to Google Voice, you’ve come to the right place. In this post, I will explain the process that I went through porting my number. Just to be clear, you can’t port your phone number directly from Vonage to Google Voice. However, it is possible. Porting a Vonage number to Google Voice require two steps. First, you need to port your number to a wireless provider. I chose AT&T. Second, once the number is transferred to the wireless provider, you will need to port it again to Google Voice. Unfortunately, there is no other easier way.

Vonage to AT&T

You can go with any wireless provider that you prefer. I chose AT&T since I’m already a customer.  The porting process usually takes anywhere from 7-10 days.  Since you are only doing this temporarily, I suggest you get yourself a prepaid GoPhone. Getting a prepaid phones will not require you to be tied to a 2 year contract. You just pay as you go, but AT&T require that I purchase a prepaid card.

So, I went to a AT&T store, and told the sales guy exactly what I was going to do. He did not have a problem with it. He asked me for my Vonage phone number, account number and ID. After a few minutes, I received a SIM card in return. I also had to purchase a $25 prepaid card, but there is no need for me to get a GoPhone. The cheapest GoPhone was $20. Unless you need one, you can probably skip purchasing one.

AT&T to Google Voice

Once the porting process is cleared with AT&T, I ported the number again to Google Voice. You can only port once to Google Voice. The porting fee is $20 payable via Google Wallet. Google will check if your number is available for porting. It will then go over the several porting conditions that I detailed below.

The cost of porting is $20.00 (payable through Google Wallet). Your mobile phone service plan will be terminated when you port your number to Google Voice and your carrier may charge you an early termination fee. Once porting is complete, you will not be able to receive calls to your mobile phone until you complete the following steps: Google Voice is not a mobile phone service provider, so you must setup a new mobile phone service plan (with your existing carrier or a new carrier) and request a new number. Once you’ve secured a new mobile service plan and a new number, you will need to add this new number to your Google Voice account as a forwarding phone. You may be unable to receive text messages for up to 3 business days after the porting process is complete. Your Google Voice number will be replaced by the number you are porting. It will remain on your account for 90 days(you will be able to make it permanent for a one-time $20.00 fee).

Google will also ask you for more details, like the wireless account number, phone number, address, etc. The porting process usually takes about 24 hours. Once you have confirmation from Google that the porting process is complete, your Vonage number should now magically work with Google Voice.

Total Cost

I spent $25 for the prepaid card and $20 for Google Voice port fee. The total cost to port from Vonage to Google Voice was $45. It was worth it, if you really want to hold on to your old number. With Google Voice, I can now call any US or Canadian mobile or landline phone for free.

Secure Your Dropbox Folder

If you are a Dropbox user, you might want to check your public folders. You might be inadvertantly sharing documents and photos with the rest of the world. By default, when you install Dropbox, there are two public folders that are publicly searcheable by search engines.

The most obvious shared folder is Public. That’s a no brainer. To my surprise, anything under the Photos folder is also searcheable by search engines. Here’s my case in point. Open this link. You will see thousands of search results of Dropbox users and their photos.

If you are going to use Dropbox to store photos and documents, do not use the Public and Photos folder. Unless you want to share it with the rest of the world. Place your photos and other documents in a separate folders instead.

If you want to share photos and documents, it’s better to share it privately with individuals, as opposed to having everyone access to your files. Credit to ghacks.net. Check out the comments on that article as well.