How to Install Ghost on Ubuntu 16.04

What is Ghost?

Ghost is an Open Source software project. What does that mean, exactly?

Firstly: It means that the Ghost application is free. Free to use, free to modify, free to share, free to redistribute. You can do anything you like with the software, without legal restriction. When you download a copy of Ghost, you own it. It’s completely yours.

Secondly: It means that Ghost is created almost entirely by volunteers. The project is organised and run by a small, Non-Profit Organisation called the Ghost Foundation – but it is developed in public, by a large group of contributors all over the world who donate their time and skills to creating a blogging platform for everyone. You can help!

Ghost is an application which is created for and made possible by its community of users.

How to Install Ghost by HowtoForge.

OpenOffice and LibreOffice

Some are calling for OpenOffice and LibreOffice to join forces. Others just want OpenOffice to go away, so that LibreOffice can become the dominant open-source office suite that it deserves. To give you some history why there are two parallel projects, here’s’s explanation of open-source suites:

Sun Microsystems acquired the StarOffice office suite in 1999. In 2000, Sun open-sourced the StarOffice software — this free, open-source office suite was known as The project continued with help from Sun employees and volunteers, offering the free office suite to everyone — including Linux users.

In 2011, Sun Microsystems was acquired by Oracle. They renamed the proprietary StarOffice office suite to “Oracle Open Office,” as if they wanted to cause confusion, and then discontinued it. Most outside volunteers — including the contributors to Go-oo, who contributed a set of enhancements used by many Linux distributions — left the project and formed LibreOffice. LibreOffice was a fork of and is built on the original code base. Most Linux distributions, including Ubuntu, switched their bundled office suite from to LibreOffice.

The original seemed down and out. In 2011, Oracle gave the trademarks and code to the Apache Software Foundation. The project known as OpenOffice today is actually Apache OpenOffice and is being developed under Apache’s umbrella under the Apache license.

LibreOffice has been developing more quickly and releasing new versions more frequently, but the Apache OpenOffice project isn’t dead. Apache released the beta version of OpenOffice 4.1 in March, 2014.

Since OpenOffice is nearing it’s end, others are wishing the two projects to merge.

Or just make way for LibreOffice to be the open-source standard.

PCIe 4.0

Version 4.0 of the PCIe computer bus standard will arrive in 2017 according to PCMag.

Version 4.0 of the PCIe specification, which will introduce greatly increased speeds as well as other improvements intended to make it viable in a wider range of applications, is slated to be released in early 2017. PCIe 4.0 will essentially double the interconnect performance bandwidth of the current 3.0 specification, from 8 gigatransfers per second (GTps) to 16GTps. In addition, it introduces new technologies to enhance power efficiency: the use of an L1 substate that drastically lowers power use in idle mode; half-swing and quarter-swing, which cut power consumption by 400mV and 200mV, respectively; and high-speed data transfer bursts with minimum idle power.

Microsoft PowerShell Released

Microsoft loves Linux. And Open Source. That wasn’t always the case back then. From Ars Technica:

Microsoft today released its PowerShell scripting language and command-line shell as open source. The project joins .NET and the Chakra JavaScript engine as an MIT-licensed open source project hosted on GitHub. Alpha version prebuilt packages of the open source version are available for CentOS, Ubuntu, and OS X, in addition, of course, to Windows. Additional platforms are promised in the future.

Digital Ocean Snapshots

Digital Ocean snapshots are no longer free. Starting October 1, 2016, Digital Ocean will start charging for snapshots at 5 cents per GB. Here are some of the highlights:

Starting October 1, 2016, we will begin charging for snapshot storage at $0.05 per gigabyte per month. This will first be reflected in the invoice posted to your account on November 1, 2016. Like other features, snapshot storage uses hourly pricing, and size is calculated from a compressed version of the snapshot—not the total disk space allocated to the Droplet. Also, you can now take Droplet snapshots without having to power off the Droplet. You can see this in action by taking a snapshot of a Droplet while it’s still running. Over the coming weeks, we will update the Snapshots page to show the costs associated with your snapshot storage more easily and we’ll also send another reminder before charges begin on October 1, 2016. Be sure to see your usage on the Snapshots page and delete unused snapshots to avoid any unexpected charges.

Debian Turns 23

Debian is 23 years old. From Debian’s site:

Today is Debian’s 23rd anniversary. If you are close to any of the cities celebrating Debian Day 2016, you’re very welcome to join the party! If not, there’s still time for you to organize a little celebration or contribution to Debian. For example, you can have a look at the Debian timeline and learn about the history of the project. If you notice that some piece of information is still missing, feel free to add it to the timeline. Or you can scratch your creative itch and suggest a wallpaper to be part of the artwork for the next release. Our favorite operating system is the result of all the work we have done together. Thanks to everybody who has contributed in these 23 years, and happy birthday Debian!


Google is working on a new operating system called Fuchsia. From the Verge:

Google appears to have started work on a completely new operating system, but no one knows quite what it’s for. The project’s name is Fuchsia, and it currently exists as a growing pile of code on the search giant’s code depository and on GitHub, too. The fledgling OS has a number of interesting features, but so far Google has yet to comment on its intended function. All we really know is that this looks like a fresh start for Google, as the operating system does not use the Linux kernel — a core of basic code that underpins both Android and Chrome OS.