Malware on Hard Drives

Kapersky Labs have uncovered a malware that exists on hard drives. They say it’s a piece of work by a group called the Equation group. Or it could be the work of NSA. The malware is so sophisticated that there’s no known tool to remove them. The malware can rewrite the firmware of hard drives. They are impossible to detect, let alone remove. The Equation group has been known as far back as 2001.

Cloud Computing Market Share

Cloud Computing is a $20 billion yearly business. In the latest poll, Amazon Web Services dominates the market with a 28% market share. Microsoft Azure is gaining share at 10%, and there’s the rest of the pack lagging behind. Not only that, cloud revenues are increasing yearly. In 2014, cloud computing has gained 48% over the year before.  ReadWrite’s article even mentions Digital Ocean as a favorite for web developers.

Does OpenStack Scale?

In a recent article by ReadWrite.com, it talks about Openstack, the open-source software that control a cloud of servers. One of the compelling arguments against OpenStack is its inability to scale with large implementations. Some companies are bringing in Juniper to help with their Contrail Networking and OpenContrail products to alleviate the scaling issues.

All Major Browsers Hacked

Chrome, Firefox, Explorer, Safari were all hacked at the Pwn2Own contest in Vancouver this week. Well, it’s not the good news we all wanted to hear, but the Pwn2Own conference is the kind of conference that rewards hackers by revealing their hacks to the public.

And that’s a good thing. In time, developers of Chrome, Firefox, Explorer and Safari can submit fixes to patch their browsers. But, it doesn’t bode well when hackers continually find browser security holes on a yearly basis.

The biggest winner this year is South Korean security researcher and serial browser hacker JungHoon Lee, also known online as lokihardt. His Google Chrome attack earned him the largest payout for a single exploit in the history of the competition.

He earned $75,000 for the Chrome bug, an extra $25,000 for a privilege escalation to SYSTEM and another $10,000 for also hitting the browser’s beta version for a total of $110,000.